Episode #30 – “The Butterfly Ball (Part 3: The Album)

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Show Updates:

  • Comments from social media.

Thanks to Our Patrons:

Thanks to our Brothers at the Deep Dive Podcast Network:

Thanks to the Patron Saint and Archivist of The Deep Purple Podcast:

Lead Up To Album & Writing:

Album Art & Booklet Review

  • Harry Wilcock’s credits include Elton John’s Captain Fantastic as well as the Judi Dench version of The Butterfly Ball and Gordon Giltrap’s The Peacock Party album which, interestingly, features John Gustafson on bass.  It also features Rod Edwards and Roger Hand who worked on the music and instrumentation on the Judi Dench version.

Credits

Notes

  • Adapted by Roger Glover for a full colour animated television series produced by British Lion Films Limited in association with Aurelia Enterprises Limited from the design and illustrations of the book “The Butterfly Ball” by Alan Aldridge first published 1973 by Jonathan Cape Limited and Times Newspapers Limited in association with Aurelia Enterprises Limited.
  • Recorded at Kingsway Recorders, London, during the summer of 1974.
  • © Copyright : Glove Music Ltd. and British Lion Music Ltd. 1974.
  • Published by British Lion Music Ltd.
  • ℗ Purple Records Inc.
  • EMI Records Ltd. Made and printed in Gt. Britain.
  • 7412 Garrod & Lofthouse Ltd.
  • Illustrations © Aurelia Enterprises Ltd. 1973
  • Eddie Hardin was currently working with The Spencer Davis Group and knew Glover from when Hardin & York supported Deep Purple on tour in 1971.
  • Ray Fenwick, Mo Foster, and Les Binks of Fancy filled out the rest of the band.

The Album

  1. Dawn
    • Roger Glover on Synthesizer
    • Instrumental
  2. Get Ready
    • Glenn Hughes sings the part of Harold the Herald, arranged and conducted by Martyn Ford and John Bell
    • Based on the poem “Harold the Herald.”
    • Sung by Glenn Hughes
  3. Saffron Dormouse & Lizzie Bee
    • Helen Chappelle as Saffron, Barry St. John as Lizzy, arranged and conducted by Mike Moran
    • Based on the poems “Mrs. Doormouse” and “Lizzy Bee.”
    • Sung by Helen Chapelle & Barry St. John
  4. Harlequin Hare
    • Neil Lancaster sings the part of a one man band
    • Sung by Neil Lancaster
    • Based on the poem “Harlequin Hare.”
  5. Old Bind Mole
    • John Goodison sings about a contented mole
    • Sung by John Goodison
    • Based on the poem “Old Blind Mole.”
  6. Magician Moth
    • Roger Glover on Synthesizer
    • Instrumental
    • Based on the poem “Magician Moth.”
  7. No Solution
    • Mickey Lee Soule sings to the Toad in bed
    • Sung by Micky Lee Soule
    • Based on the poem “Toad in Bed.”
  8. Behind the Smile
    • David Coverdale warns Lilly Lizard of the Fox
    • Sung by David Coverdale
    • Based on the poem “Punchinello.”
  9. Fly Away
    • Liza Strike sings to the caterpillars
    • Sung by Liza Strike
    • Based on the poem “Esmeralda, Seraphin and Camilla.”
  10. Aranea
    • Judi Kuhl sings the part of the conceited money spider
    • Sung by Judi Kuhl
    • Based on the poem “Miss Money Spider.”
  11. Sitting in a Dream
    • Ronnie Dio sings the part of Froggy, arranged and conducted by Del Newman
    • Sung by Ronnie James Dio
    • Based on the poem “Froggy.”
  12. Waiting
    • Jimmy Helms sings the part of the Kingfisher
    • Sung by Jimmy Helms (Wikipedia, Discogs)
    • Based on the poem “Waiting for a Bite.”
  13. Sir Maximus Mouse
    • Eddie Hardin sings about the business mouse
    • Sung by Eddie Hardin
    • Based on the poem “Sir Maximus Mouse.”
  14. Dreams of Sir Bedivere
    • Arranged and conducted by Martyn Ford and John Bell
    • Instrumental
    • Based on the poem “Sir Bedivere and the Stag-Beetle.”
  15. Together Again
    • Tony Ashton sings and plays a Newt
    • Sung by Tony Ashton (Wikipedia, Discogs)
    • Based on the poem “Cheers, My Dears.”
  16. Watch Out For The Bat
  17. Little Chalk Blue
    • Not on original album.
    • Sung by John Lawton (Wikipedia, Discogs)
    • Based on the poem “The Butterflies’ Air-Lift and the Weevils v. Caterpillars Cricket Match.”
    • This had previously only been available as a single but here is added in the order it would have been performed at the Royal Albert Hall Concert.
    • Not released on the album version until the 1989 Connoisseur Collection reissue.
  18. The Feast
    • Simon Centipedes’ Time of Times
    • Instrumental
  19. Love is All
    • Ronnie Dio as Froggy sings at the Butterfly Ball
    • Documentary on the single “Love is All” from Dutch TV
    • Sung by Ronnie James Dio
    • Based on the poem “The Butterfly Ball.”
    • Roger Glover describes the feeling from hearing Dio sing it as an “all out feeling of joy.”
    • Dio: “People thought it was Roger singing the song so . . . boy that Roger Glover can really sing, can’t he?”
    • Hardin did chord projections, Glover came up with melody.
    • Hardin says they’d spend all night doing one mix. Glover was very particular and would scrap the whole mix and it would drive him mad.
    • Hardin: “Most of my songs are very melodic, Roger is very riffy.”  Says that he and Roger worked very well together for this reason.
    • Ray Fenwick added the little line at the beginning, the descending line that leads into the first verse.
    • Hardin says that after they recorded it he said it was “Sunny Afternoon” by the Kinks.  Described it as “not a conscious theft.”
    • Hardin: “To me, Ronnie made the song special.”  Eddie tried singing it and it was okay, Roger tried singing it and it was okay.  Describes Ronnie as transforming the song.
    • Dio describes it as being very Beatle-like.  Very upbeat song.
    • Glover deliberately took a Beatles-type approach in writing the song.
    • Glover wanted it to be an “All You Need is Love” type song after reading the poetry in the book.  He calls it a “parody of ‘All You Need is Love.’” or “All you need is Love part 2.”
    • Single was released in England and heavily played and promoted on the radio but didn’t catch on.  The publisher called Eddie Hardin and said it’s gone to #3 in Holland then an hour later said it went to #2 and by lunchtime it had hit #1.  Was at #1 by lunch.
    • Very successful in the rest of Europe. 
    • Glover describes it as “very hard to write a happy song without being trite.  But with a message like “love is all” it’s very close to being trite.”
    • Hardin always felt like the whole Butterfly Ball was a joint effort and when it came out it had “Roger Glover and Guests” and he felt a little instulted that he was just a guest.
    • Ronnie got his first gold record and it said “Roger Glover” on it.  “That annoyed me.” He insisted it was changed and they changed it for him which is why it says “Featuring Ronnie Dio” on it.
  20. Homeward
    • Ronnie Dio (Froggy) sings on the way home
    • Sung by Ronnie James Dio
    • Based on the poem “Homeward.”

Reception and Review

  • Chas Watkins (engineer):
    • “Kingsway had always had the problem with sound filtering upstairs into the offices of the Civil Aviation Authority.”
    • They recorded quiet music “lift music” in the day time.  After 6pm they would record rock.
    • Chas learned a lot from Martin Birch.
    • “One particular memory of Ronnie Dio: the control room looked width-ways across one end of the studio, so a camera looked down the length of the studio, with a monitor in the control room.  Ronnie was doing a vocal (can’t remember which track) sitting on a stool, and the camera was positioned on him. He said, ‘just getting a glass of water”, and went off-camera. When he returned onto camera and sat on the stool, he was completely naked!  He just didn’t say anything, just carried on singing as though nothing was unusual! Everyone in the control room was in tears! Very funny.
    • The air conditioning was very loud so they’d have to turn off the AC when they recorded quiet vocals or instruments and it would get very hot in the studio.  The switch for the AC was behind a burlap flap on the back wall. When you lifted the flap there was a picture of a naked lady so many people were eager to turn off the AC.
      • “Recording the Butterfly Ball was a wonderful experience.  All these top-notch musicians coming into the studio, and Roger producing, writing and having responsibility for the whole project.”
  • Single success.  Love Is All was Ronnie James Dio’s first gold record.
  • Glover: “The whole thing was a challenge and a joy.  It took around six months to complete and I worked with some lovely people.”
  • Glover: “I can see a couple of things that might hold it back, primarily my name.  The album can’t exactly be described as a family album but then again it’s not anything in te mould of Deep Purple.”
  • The album was not received well by rock audiences who felt it was music for kids.
  • It didn’t get a lot of exposure to a wider audience.
  • Love Is All, as stated before, did very well in the charts throughout Europe.
  • Given the lack of sales the idea of doing the live concert to give the album a boost was floated.  Glover was able to get almost everyone from the original recording with a few special guests.

In The News . . .

Primary Wave Acquiring Bob Ezrin Rights Portfolio

Catalogue includes: Alice Cooper, KISS, Pink Floyd, last two Deep Purple albums

Ian Gillan A Visual Biography 

Ian Gillan – A Visual Biography.

Publication date – 6th December 2019.

This 128 page limited edition hardback book is a wonderful collector’s item for any self-confessed Gillan fan. Housed in a custom-made presentation box with a set of prints, it is strictly limited to 1000 copies.

Order your copy now and get YOUR NAME on a dedicated fan page within the book!

Without doubt Ian Gillan has proven to be one of the greatest and most enduring rock singers of all time. From his early career in sixties pop band Episode Six, through to Deep Purple, as well as a brief period with Black Sabbath, he has continued to surprise and delight millions of fans around the world.

    Forays into unchartered territory, such as his role in the original Jesus Christ Superstar, as well as a variety of solo projects, including the jazz inspired Ian Gillan Band have proven that time and again, Ian Gillan is more than just the lead singer with Deep Purple.

    This publication plots his career from the early sixties through to the present day in a visual timeline that charts his extraordinary and colourful career. Digging deep into the archives we have managed to pull together a vast array of photos and imagery, much of which has never been seen before. This includes many previously unpublished photos from his days with Episode Six and beyond. Off stage and backstage photos from his early career, through to Deep Purple and his solo projects are all included, alongside on stage photos capturing Ian doing what he does best.

    A Visual Biography also includes many rare items of memorabilia, including a full itinerary from the Ian Gillan Band’s 1977 Japanese tour, plus posters and cuttings that help to document over fifty years as one of rock’s most iconic frontmen.

 EDITORIAL CONTROL:

This book requires total independent editorial control. It has not been authorised or approved by Ian Gillan or his management.

This Week in Purple History . . .

November 18 through November 24

  • November 18, 1974 – The Butterfly Ball is released in the UK
  • November 18, 1989 – Slip of the Tongue is released
  • November 18, 2006 – JLT forms Over the Rainbow
  • November 23, 1994 – DP plays three shows in secret in Mexico to test prospective new guitarist Steve Morse

For Further Information:

Listener Mail/Comments

  • Comments about the show? Things you’d like us to cover?  We’d love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

Episode #29 – The Butterfly Ball (Part 2: The Singers)

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Show Updates:

  • Comments from social media.
  • Patron Peter Gardow catches the rainbow when he bumps into David Keith, drummer for Blackmore’s Night and Rainbow!

Thanks to Our Patrons:

Thanks to our Brothers at the Deep Dive Podcast Network:

Thanks to the Patron Saint and Archivist of The Deep Purple Podcast:

Notes From The Field:

  • John reviews his time in Miami and seeing Ace Frehley.
  • Promoting the band Thunder Mother!

The Singers:

In The News . . .

  • Martin Popoff is on the latest episode (Episode #37) of the Shockwaves Skullsessions podcast.  There he reviews the entire Rainbow catalog.  Came out the same exact day as our Rainbow episode and he seems to share a similar perspective on the album.

This Week in Purple History . . .

November 11 through November 17

  • November 16, 1974 – Stormbringer is released
  • November 17, 1975 – Tommy Bolin’s Teaser is released
  • November 11, 2010 – Tony Edwards dies

For Further Information:

Listener Mail/Comments

  • Comments about the show? Things you’d like us to cover?  We’d love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

Episode #28 – The Butterfly Ball (Part 1: The Musicians)

Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Breaker, PodBean, RadioPublic, or search in your favorite podcatcher! 

Thanks to Our Patrons:

Thanks to our Brothers at the Deep Dive Podcast Network:

Thanks to the Patron Saint and Archivist of The Deep Purple Podcast:

Show Updates:

  • Comments from social media.
  • Listener Steve emails with some recollections after attending both shows of the Concerto ‘99 performance at the Royal Albert Hall:

I heard you guys talking about the Concerto ’99 shows at the Royal Albert Hall in ’99. I was there, both nights, so I reckon you might be interested in some of the things I remember.

First of all there were two nights, on the Saturday and Sunday of the same weekend. The DVD seems to all have come from the second night, as far as I can recall after 20 years.

The Albert Hall has boxes high up all around, I suspect as they were recording it that they didn’t sell the boxes until the lower seats so the place would seem full even if there were unsold tickets. On the first night I was on the floor, on the second in one of the boxes, on the right side looking towards the stage.

On night one, there was a disturbance in one of the boxes on the left side early on during the first movement. It seems like some idiots who didn’t know what they were buying tickets from were pissed off at hearing classical when they thought they were going to be getting Highway Star. The manager (at least I think that was who it was) turfed them out and gave them their money back, with a bonus earful of abuse for fucking up the recording.

Also on night one it seems they didn’t anticipate an encore. iirc they closed on Smoke, but the crowd stayed chanting for more. Eventually Ian Gillan came out to talk to us, he said Jon Lord was absolutely exhausted out back and they weren’t going to do an encore, but was very gracious and I think the crowd was more or less ok with it.  Gillan could have had an alternative career as a hostage negotiator.  It may also just have been that Lord was really pissed off with the recording being ruined, I dunno. On the second night they obviously adjusted things, and left the stage a bit earlier so they could come back on and do at least Smoke as an encore.

I think I remember Gillan introducing Steve Morris (from his solo albums) as Steve Morse, and then half-singing something like “I never get it right” as he corrected.

I always loved the concerto, I used to listen to it quite a lot to unwind after night shifts in my first job as a 17 year old, to get the chance to see it live (twice!) was wonderful for me, and the concert was just designed to perfection as it was just awesome to see all these obscure (to most people) numbers off records I love like Butterfly Ball, Pictured Within and Accidentally on Purpose. The Purple mini set was too short, but the set list was excellent, I was more interested in hearing stuff that Gillan can still sing than Highway Star or Child In Time that his voice is no longer right for.

One last memory: as I was walking out on the Sunday (you can exit straight from the boxes out on to the driveway that surrounds the Hall, rather than going through the main entrance) I came across the sight of one James Patrick Page being guided to his limo humming the riff to Smoke on the Water. (at least I think it was a limo, some black luxury car in any case.) So if anyone tries to tell you that Page hates Purple, as I have had people try to do from time to time, they are full of shit.

Good luck to you guys for your podcast!

  • Mark 1 listener poll – songs moving to the next round:
    • April
    • Chasing Shadows
    • Hush
    • Mandrake Root
    • Shield
    • Wring That Neck
  • Nate guests on the Paul or Nothing podcast to review The Beatles’ “Abbey Road” 50th Anniversary Edition.

Notes From The Field:

  • Nate reviews Deep Purple show on October 18, 2019 at the Rosemont Theater in Rosemont, IL.
  • Unfortunate issue with meet and greet
  • Got to meet our patron Steve!
  • Steve gave me this incredible custom made journal using the vinyl of Made in Europe!
  • Joyous Wolf
  • At the beginning of Don Airey’s keyboard solo he threw in a few bars from “Mr. Crowley.”

Origins of The Butterfly Ball:

  • Aldridge went on to create two more books based on the sequels; “The Peacock Party” and “The Lion’s Cavalcade.”
    • An animated short was made in 1974 based on the book with Roger Glover’s “Love is All” accompanying it.  This was supposed to lead up to a full length animated film.
    • This did not matter so it was released as an album.
    • William Plomer worked as an editor for Ian Fleming’s James Bond novels.
    • Plomer died just a few months after completing “The Butterfly Ball.”
  • Alan Aldridge:
    • Alan Aldridge in the British museum one day, found a poem called “Butterfly Ball” about the creatures in the woods — all put down their anger for the day and have a good time. Spent about a year doing all the pictures.
    • Alan Aldridge because it was such a success he became known as a children’s illustrator after mostly being a “Druggy” or psychadelic illustrator.   
    • At one point it was the best selling children’s book in the world.
    • Alan Aldridge thought about doing it as a movie.  He mentioned it to Pink Floyd. Roger was mentioned and Aldridge brought it to their management.
    • There’s also mention that it was originally intended to be a solo project for Jon Lord with Roger Glover as the producer.
  • Roger Glover:
    • Glover: “The Sunday times had a color supplement about the new book with illustrations.  Caught his eye. A year later he went in the management office and the book was in the office.  They asked him how he would like to put it to music.
    • “There’s a thought.  Why me?”
    • Glover was shocked as his track record was being a bass player in a hard rock band.  Glover called it “blind faith.”
    • Glover was given a list of albums to listen to by Aldridge but exactly which albums were on this list is unclear.
    • Glover specifically recruited the musicians and singers for the album.

Musicians:

  • Drums: 
    • Les Binks
      • One of first credits is Butterfly Ball
      • We’ve played Fancy before on the show
      • Fancy – “She’s Riding the Rock Machine” (1976)
      • Fancy – Touch Me (1974)
      • Got gig in Judas Priest through Roger Glover connection
      • Judas Priest – “Exciter” off of “Stained Class” album (1978)
        • Kind of reminds me of “Stormbringer” riff
      • Recorded 2 albums with Priest, Stained Class and Killing Machine
      • Left the band amicably.  They were looking for a more of a rock drummer and Binks had too much of a jazz influence and was unwilling to change his style.
      • Plays around London and currently has “Les Binks’ Priesthood” which plays Judas Priest songs
    • Michael Giles
      • Giles, Giles, and Fripp with his brother Peter and Robert Fripp
      • Released one album “The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles, and Fripp”
      • Eventually morphed into King Crimson
        • “The Court of the Crimson King” (1969)
        • We’ve discussed 21st Century Scizoid Man
  • Jack Emblow: Accordion
  • Guitar: Ray Fenwick
    • Don’t want to go too far down this path as I would love to do future episode (or episodes) about Fenwick and many of his albums
    • Started out in 1964 in a ska band called “Ray and the Devils”
    • Was also in The Syndicats, followed by a Dutch group called Tee Set 
    • He was in the Spencer Davis Group 1967-1969
    • Stateside off of “Keep America Beautiful, Get a Haircut” (1971)
    • Then recorded album with Bo Diddley called “The London Bo Diddley Sessions in 1972
    • Ian Gillan Band
    • Jon Lord’s “Windows”
    • Fancy who we’ve covered on the show in the past
  • Keyboards: Eddie Hardin
    • Hardin & York – Drinking My Wine
    • Another one we could devote several future episodes to at least
  • Violin: Eddie Jobson
  • Tabla: Chris Karan
  • Piano: Mike Moran [discogs]
    • Worked with Queen, Ozzy, George Harrison, and David Bowie in Ziggy Stardust: The Motion picture
    • Andrew Lloyd Weber
    • Keyboards of Ian Gillan Band’s “Child in Time” album
    • Played with Ted Neeley.
    • Mostly known for production
    • Mike Moran – The Pickup (1976)
    • The Driver from the album Keytronics (1978)
  • Piano: Ann Odell
    • Performed with Yvonne Elliman, Andrew Lloyd Weber, John Gustafson’s solo album “Goose Grease” and Sphincter Ensemble
    • “Swing Song” from the album “A Little Taste” (1973)
  • Bassoon: Robin Thompson
  • Saw: Nigel Watson
  • Orchestra: The Mountain Fjord Orchestra
    • Also played on Elf’s “Carolina County Ball” (love Ball-themed albums)
    • Graham Parker and the Rumor – Stick to Me
    • Elton John – Jump Up!
    • David Woodcock: Conducted Orchestra (no info available on David Woodcock)
      • Jackson Heights – Bump ‘N’ Grind ??
    • Conducted by: 
      • Martyn Ford (also known as Martyn Fjord Orchestra)
        • Did work as conductor for:
        • Ginger Baker, Elton John, the film Tommy
        • Worked with the Spencer Davis Group
        • Released albums with John Gustafson  on his 1976 album “Smoovin’”
        • In 1980s worked with Kate Bush, Phil Collins, Dave Davies
        • Official Website: http://www.martynford.co.uk/
      • Jon Bell – 
        • Mostly writing/arrangement credits, but a few early performance credits.
        • Played clarinet on the album Poet and the One Man Band (1969) featuring Albert Lee.
        • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Vz54oqdtbE
        • At the 11:30 minute mark “The Days I Most Remember”, interesting stuff, reminiscent of “April”
        • “Good Evening Mr. Jones” Clarinet at 28:50 mark
      • Del Newman
        • Orchestral arrangements for:
        • Cat Stevens
        • Elton John
        • Carly Simon
        • Rod Steward
        • Also Hollywood films and musicals

In The News . . .

This Week in Purple History . . .

November 4 through November 10

  • November 10, 1940 – Screaming Lord Sutch is born
  • November 10, 1971 – Ray Fenwick releases “Keep America Beautiful, Get a Haircut
  • November 8, 1975 – Tommy Bolin’s first show with Deep Purple in Honolulu

Deep Purple Deep Track of the Week:

  • N/A

Book and/or Documentary Reviews:

  •  For future episodes.

For Further Information:

Listener Mail/Comments

  • Comments about the show? Things you’d like us to cover?  We’d love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

Episode #27 – Glenn Hughes – Play Me Out

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Thanks to Our Patrons:

  • Clay Wombacher – $5 tier
  • Steve Seaborg (Alltheworldsastage.net) – $5 tier
  • Peter Gardow – $3 tier
  • Ells Murders – $1 tier
  • Spacey Noodles – $1 tier

Thanks to our Brothers at the Deep Dive Podcast Network:

Thanks to the Patron Saint and Archivist of The Deep Purple Podcast:

Show Updates:

  • Mike Healy on Twitter points out that the “Funky Junction Play a Tribute to Deep Purple” album cover features an entirely different band, Hard Stuff.
  • Spacey Noodles writes in to tell us about Ian Gillan’s Caramba TV channel on YouTube.  Looks like it was abandoned about a year ago unfortunately.
  • Thank you to Steve Seaborg for the generous offer of tickets to see UFO!
  • Alphabetical poll to pick our listeners’ favorite mark 1 song.

Notes From The Field:

  • John reviews Deep Purple show at Mohegan Sun in Uncasville, CT on October 9, 2019.

Lead Up To Album & Writing:

  • From Glenn Hughes’s autobiography:
    • Songs left over from Come Taste the Band that DP didn’t use.
    • Very messed up on cocaine at the time of writing album.
    • Tells a story of having cocaine paranoia, running around with a knife into a field because he thought there was someone in the tall grass.
    • He talks about this being the point where drugs stopped being fun.  He just couldn’t stop doing them.
    • He became violent and exhausted at home.
    • His only comfort was sitting in front of his Fender Rhodes, playing, and writing music.
    • He says he was in a lot of pain when he wrote the album.
    • His intention was to push his musical abilities.  He wanted to show everyone what he was capable of with this album.
    • He was upset that Lord and Paice formed PAL.
    • He was upset that Lord had ended up with his girlfriend.
    • He wanted to show everyone that he was musically superior.
    • Mick Jagger offered Hughes use of his studio to record the album.
    • Hughes says he was out of his mind on speed when he recorded Play Me Out.
    • Album was written and recorded in ten days.  Glenn Hughes claims that he never slept once during that time.  He recorded all the basic tracks, vocals, and backing vocals.
    • Hughes says he saw a nurse walking through the studio with a poodle and had a conversation with her.  
    • The strings were recorded later on in L.A.
    • The album was mixed at Island.
    • Hughes admits to being totally out of it but is proud of the vocals he did.
    • Hughes describes the album as being very painful for him.  She said it was all about him breaking up with Vicky Gibbs and her leaving him for Jon Lord.  It was about losing his girlfriend to his mentor.
  • From CD liner notes:
    • Original plan was to release the single “Smile” then finish it up with the album.
    • Found a studio called LEe Sound Studio, a 16 track studio to work in.
    • Glenn would clock in hearly to do the writing so by the ntime the musicians got there they’d be ready to work.
    • The bulk of the album was recorded in 1976.  After the basic tracks were laid down he re-joined Trapeze.
    • It was almost a year later when ti was released.
    • Safari was the sister label to Oyster (which did Rainbow) and that was who released Play Me Out.
    • Released in Germany first as that was the biggest market for ex-Purple.
    • The album cost $16,000 to make.  This was considered pocket change even in 1977.
    • Recorded his parts with a drum machine then added other instruments after.

Album Lineup

  • Arranged By [Horns], Saxophone [Baritone, Tenor, Alto] – Ron Aspery
  • Arranged By [Strings] – Graham Prescott*
    • He is best known for his work with Tom Jones, Deep Purple, Cher, Paul McCartney, Hans Zimmer, Jon Bon Jovi, John Williams, among others.
  • Drums – Dave Holland (2)
  • Engineer – Brad Davis
    • Started his career 1969, working for A&R Studios, NYC.
    • Moved to London in 1974 and worked on movies Serpico, Godspell, The Godfather (1 & 2), Holy Mountain, and others.
    • Worked for Marcus Recording Studios, London from June 1979 until roughly mid-1982.
    • Worked on an album in 1988 about the Baseball team the Rangers.
    • Worked with John Prine, Ian Gillan Band’s Clear Air Turbulence, Stan Clarke, Trapeze, King Crimson, Wang Chung, and many more.
  • Other [Assistant Equipment Co-ordination] – Andy Field, Dave Whitehouse, Frank Merricks, Willy Fyffe
  • Recorded By [Assistant At Air] – Jon Walls
    • Performed with Jimmy Buffet
    • Production with Olivia Newton John, Marvin Gaye, and The Pretenders amongst others
  • Recorded By [Assistant At Island] – Barry Sage
    • Production with The Rolling Stones, Brian Eno, and Bad Brains amongst other

Album Art & Booklet Review

  • Original cover had two Glenn Hughes heads, like a 70s portrait.
  • 1995 Re-release went to one Glenn Hughes head.
  • 40th anniversary moved back to original cover.
  • Photography [Cover] – Gered Mankowitz

Album Details and Analysis:

  • Recorded at Lee Sound Basing Street (Island) and Air Studios.
  • This Album is dedicated to my best friend Tommy Bolin.
  • (P)&(C)1977 Deep Purple (Overseas) Limited.
  • Made in England
  1. I Got It Covered
    • Space High
      • It’s About Time
        • Tommy Bolin liked this song and suggested it should be recorded for Come Taste The Band.
        • Deep Purple rehearsed it but at the last minute Hughes decided to hold it back.
      • L.A. Cut Off
        • Well
          • Soulution
            • Your Love Is Like a Fire
              • Destiny (Galley, Holland, Hughes)
                • I Found a Woman
                  • Last song recorded for the album.
                  • The “woman” he’s speaking of is “my music.”

                Album Review & Reception

                • After they had finished recording Hughes was flying with Terry Rowley from HEathrow to Chicago.  He was coming down off the speed and he got off the plane to get a sandwich during a connection. The plane left without him.  The masters of Play Me Out were on the plane. Luckily Terry was on the pane and kept them safe.
                • Geoff Barton did a positive review.
                • Pete Makowski did a positive review.
                • Rave reviews in the music weekly Sounds by Geoff Barton.
                • Record was solid with die-hard fans but didn’t get any live promotion, despite a Glenn Hughes Band tour being planned.
                • It was re-released in 1983 as interest in the band and its former members was growing.
                • Most DP fans were confused by the album.
                • After the release Ozzy told Hughes he wanted to form a band called Blizzard of Ozz with Hughes on bass.  Hughes didn’t want to be in a band where he didn’t sing.
                • Everyone thought this was going to be a big thing and lead to great solo success for Hughes but the drugs held him back.
                • Review by Geoff Barton in Sounds magazine, 1977:
                  • Title: Soulful flight of a Purple Emperor
                  • Editor commented: Oy vey! Poetic headlines already. – Ed.
                  • ALTHOUGH THE Ian Gillan-Roger Glover incarnation of Deep Purple is the one most fondly remembered by fans, in many ways the superceding David Coverdale-Glenn Hguhes line up had as much, if not more, going for it.
                  • OK, so Coverdale, Hughes, et al never succeeded in recording an album of the overall calibre of ‘Machine Head’ (due to the steadily growing disillusionment of one Ritchie Blackmore more than anything else one would suspect, however) but in terms of sheer vocal variety and heavy rock funkability the two were, I think, unbeatable.
                  • While Ian Gillan is still regarded as the Purple vocalist, in my opinion the combined talents of Coverdale and Hughes succeeded in raising the standards set by the silver-throated screamer sky high: Voverdale’s deep, full-throated macho calls to battle were perfectly offset/supplemented by Hughess’ supremely soulful vocal excursions: the rest was shattering.  The full extend of their titanic twin vocal abilities can be best witnessed on the ‘Made In Europe’ DP LP — on ‘Burn’ and ‘You Fool No One’ in particular, methinks. Then again, if you can bear to recall PUrple’s last tour with Tommy Bolin on guitar you’ll remember Hughes’ magnificent version of ‘Georgia On My Mind’ and know that he is one of our great singers . . . a fact that hits home immediately, listening to his solo album ‘Play Me Out’.
                  • Now, this record has been out for an age I know, but it’s only recently that I’ve been able to get my hands on a copy.  On the highly unlikely label of Safari records, as far as I know and for reasons I don’t understand it’s only been released in Germany and a few other weird places like Greenland and suchlike . . . what the hell, whatever the policy/marketing restrictions, this album must be granted a full release in Britain some time in the near future, simply must.  For Glenn Hughes, it really is something of a triumph.
                  • “White soul — pshaw” scored Al Lewis upon hearing this album in the office.  Now, I’ve never found the idea of non-black funksters so objectionable as our esteemed Ed. — and it seems to me that when an artist, like Hughes has done here, puts such feeling, such effort into the making of an album, all barriers are transcended.
                  • For soul album this definitely is.  Hughes has given full rein to his ‘This Time Around’-type singing/songwriting leanings and the end result is guaranteed to bowl you over.  Recorded with his one-time Trapeze sidemates Mel Galey and Dave Holland (and with whom Hughes was suppose dto be getting a band together shortly after PUrple’s demise — something that, mysteriously, never came about) plus guests Pat Travers, Mark Nauseef and others.  ‘Play Me Out’ runs the gamut of soulful expression — from the proud, lip-pouting struf of ‘I Got It Covered’, through the warm, heart-felt ballad ‘Your Love Is Like a Fire’ up to joyous celebratory ‘I Found a Woman’.
                  • Hughes is up front all the way, his infections bass lines rippling along, weaving though every song; his voice, whether backed up/counterpointed by raunchy chick singers or soft, solemn and solitary, is totally immaculate, possessing a seemingly endless range.  Hughes knows that he’s got a great parr of ‘chords of course and occasionally this cockiness proves to be a disadvantage as he crams too many different vocal variations into a sings song; alo, he sometimes sounds too much like Stevie Wonder for comfort — unnecessary, unfortunate, but true.
                  • But even so this is a truly magnificent album 00 and in ‘Space High’ Hughes has a potential big hit on his hands, if anyone has the influence/foresight to get it released as a 45.  With the (albeit somewhat overrated) film ‘Close Encounters Of The Third Kind’ currently hot news and ‘Space High’s’ subject matter (‘Thirty-two saucers over the land,’ run the lyrics, ‘should we catch them or should we let them land?’) together with its fidgety funkiness should guarantee its resounding success.
                  • So all Purple fantastic out there: stop writing letters to SOUNDS praising garbage like ‘Powerhouse’ and instead muster your considerable collective might and see if you can do anything about getting this terrific ‘Play Me Out’ album released over here.  I’ll back you every inch of the way.
                  • GEOFF BARTON
                • Two German-language review provided less positive reviews.  These are rough translations by the wonderful Jörg Planer.
                • The first translates basically as saying that it’s basically a “boring flop.”
                • The second is more harsh saying: “Glenn is trying to play guitar and sing solo and hearing the album he isn’t and won’t be good in both.  His singing in ‘Soulution’ sounds like he’s imitating a love hungry cat.”

                In The News . . .

                • Martin Popoff’s new book Sensitive to Light: The Rainbow Story (Link to purchase here: http://www.martinpopoff.com/html/sensitive-to-light-the-rainbow-story.html )
                  • Update to his book Rainbow: English Castle Magic which is now out of print
                    • – First off, this book is 50% longer, a whopping 120,000 words and 318 pages
                    • – No pictures in the old one – two swell colour sections of photos in this one.
                    • – New interview footage with Ritchie Blackmore, Ronnie James Dio, Roger Glover, Jimmy Bain, Tony Carey, Graham Bonnet, Craig Gruber, Cozy Powell and more.
                    • – major overhaul in the writing and analysis by me
                    • – loads more research of the press, breakdown of the songs, production, album covers etc.
                    • – old one was smaller format; this one is my usual 6” x 9”
                    • – old one… hey, it was one of my very first band biographies; it was long overdue for a re-engineering and this is probably my best yet. So, as the back cover sez…
                    • – reissues and live output covered in more detail
                    • – brought up to date with the Ronnie Romero era live shows and new songs
                  • Email martinp@inforamp.net for purchase/invoicing.
                  • Link to purchase here: http://www.martinpopoff.com/html/sensitive-to-light-the-rainbow-story.html
                • Steve Morse Recalls His Worst Moment With Fans After Joining Deep Purple
                  • On a recent episode of the Ernie Ball: Striking A Chord podcast, Morse recalled one incident where a fan whipped a bottle at him — he ducked and the projectile hit co-founding keyboardist Jon Lord in the head. It was awful but even that wasn’t the worst incident.
                  • “South America. In Chile, [a man] was spitting at me,” Morse said. “Every time I would come up front to do a solo, and my eyes were closed involuntarily…because I’m into the music. I don’t have any poses or any kind of idea what I look like…I was just playing and during the last song, he spit into my mouth.”
                  • Morse still isn’t sure whether the way he looks onstage played into the fans’ vitriol or if it was solely the fact that he wasn’t Blackmore (Joe Satriani filled in for Blackmore a year earlier, so Morse didn’t understand what all the hate was about).
                  • “Anyway, this [spit] lands in my mouth suddenly,” Morse continued. “If there was a movie soundtrack, you’d hear the needle being scratched across the record. …I finally made eye contact with the guy; he was pointing to himself all proudly, ‘Yeah, it was me!'”
                  • Violated and enraged, when the song was over, Morse launched himself into the audience in an attempt to fight the spitter. He didn’t make it to the man’s neck like he wanted, but it created a pretty memorable scene for anyone who was watching.

                This Week in Purple History . . .

                October 28 through November 3

                • November 3, 1945 – Nick Simper is born
                • October 29, 1984 – Deep Purple releases “Perfect Strangers”
                • October 30, 1993 – Ritchie announced his resignation from Deep Purple

                For Further Information:

                Listener Mail/Comments

                • Comments about the show? Things you’d like us to cover?  We’d love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

                Episode #26 – Rainbow – Ritchie Blackmore’s R-A-I-N-B-O-W

                Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Breaker, PodBean, RadioPublic, or search in your favorite podcatcher! 

                Thanks to Our Patrons:

                • Clay Wombacher – $5 tier
                • Steve Seaborg (Alltheworldsastage.net) – $5 tier
                • Peter Gardow – $3 tier
                • Ells Murders – $1 tier
                • Spacey Noodles – $1 tier

                Thanks to our Brothers at the Deep Dive Podcast Network:

                Show Updates:

                Lead Up To Album & Writing:

                • We covered the end or Blackmore’s tenure in DP in Episode #18 – Stormbringer.  Stemming from his desire to cover “Black Sheep of the Family.”
                • He could not convince Coverdale to sing on Ritchie’s “solo” EP so he was able to get Ronnie James Dio who he paid flat fee of £1,000 to sing the track.
                • The chemistry between the two was so good that they ended up doing “Sixteenth Century Greensleeves” as well.
                • Ritchie: “The way he sang was just perfect for what I wanted.  I didn’t have to tell him — he just sang it.”
                • Dio: “Ritchie told me that we had to go into the studio in a couple of days to lay down a track  and asked me if I could write a lyric for him byt he following day! We went up to his room, he played me those chords and I went away having to rememebr it.  I went home and wrote the melody and lyric in my head, and it worked out fine.”
                • ELO cellist Mugh McDowell also played on these first two tracks as he was teching Ritchie the cello at the time.
                • After a break in Deep Purple’s Australian tour.  He used the rest of the band Elf (except for the unfortunate guitarist, Steve Edwards) and recorded the album between February 20 and March 14 1975 at Musicland Studios in Munich with Martin Birch.
                • This recording gave Blackmore the confidence he needed that he could do this alone and he let Deep Purple Management know but not his fellow bandmates.
                • In his book “Deep Purple & Rainbow Every Song” Steve Pilkington says: “. . . such was the shroud of secrecy and deception around every line-up change the band had, it’s a wonder that an ex-member never turned up at a gig, like the famed JApanese soldier who didn’t know the war had ended some twenty or thiry years later! Maybe that’s where Rod Evans is now . . .”

                Album Lineup

                • Ritchie Blackmore: guitar
                • Ronnie James Dio: vocals
                • Mickey Lee Soule: keyboards
                • Craig Gruber: bass
                • Gary Driscoll: drums

                Album Art & Booklet Review

                • The album cover is a painting by David Willardson.
                • The crescent moon and the castle supposedly represent the two great influences on Blackmore’s writing on the album – the middle east and medieval Erope.
                • The back cover has the lyrics to Sixteenth Century Greensleeves and a track listing.
                • Inside the gatefold is a photo spread in black and white with the center a photo of Blackmore on stage with Deep Purple though none of the rest of DP is visible.  All the live shots are of the members in their respective bands, Deep Purple and Elf.

                Album Details and Analysis:

                • Recorded at Musicland Studios in Munich.
                • Produced by Martin Birch, Ritchie Blackmore, and Ronnie Jame Dio.
                1. Man on the Silver Mountain (Blackmore, Dio)
                  • This was a staple of their live show throughout the band’s history.
                  • Live it was a bit more high energy.
                  • The title of this song is inscribed on Dio’s memorial in Hollywood Hills Cemetery in Los Angeles.
                  • Was released as a single in October of 1975 with “Snake Charmer” as a B-side by didn’t do well.
                2. Self Portrait (Blackmore, Dio)
                  • Blackmore described this as a cross between “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring” by Bach and “Manic Depression” by Hendrix.
                  • The song was briefly performed live by Rainbow and was put away until being resurrected by Blackmore’s Night with a medieval flare.
                3. Black Sheep of the Family (Hammond)
                  • The song that created Rainbow.
                  • It was recorded with the intention of being a single though it was never released as one.
                  • This song also never made it to Rainbow’s live set.
                4. Catch The Rainbow (Blackmore, Dio)
                5. Snake Charmer (Blackmore, Dio)
                  • B-side to Man on the Silver Mountain.
                  • Strong similarities to “You Can’t Do It Right.”
                6. Temple of the King (Blackmore, Dio)
                  • Medieval-influenced structure.
                  • Similar feeling to “The Gypsy”
                  • Blackmore claims that he was inspired to write this song by the TV program “Yoga For Health.”
                  • Lyrics about peasants being called to the temple by a mysterious “great black bell.”
                  • Some interpretations of the lyrics include the story of Buddha to the appearance of “The year of the fox” in fantasy literature.
                  • Was never performed live until the band reformed in the 90s with “Stranger IN US All.”
                  • Blackmore says it wasn’t suitable for live performances.
                7. If You Don’t Like Rock ‘n’ Roll (Blackmore, Dio)
                  • Filler track, blues pattern.
                  • Only played live once as an encore that is documented.
                8. Sixteenth Century Greensleeves (Blackmore, Dio)
                  • From the original session with “Black Sheep of the Family” as the B-side.
                  • Standard medieval/fantasy Rainbow track.
                  • Conjures up image of a black knight in an old castle being brought to justice.
                  • Blackmore said he was inspired by the song Greensleeves that he loved which is supposedly written by Henry VIII.
                  • Blackmore used to live near Windsor Castle and was inspired to write this song by that.
                  • Steve Pilkington calls the opening line of “It’s only been an hour since he locked her in the tower” as Spinal Tap-esque.  He says it’s a little better than “It’s only been a bit, since he threw her in the pit.”
                  • This was commonly played in their live shows.
                  • Hugh McDowell of ELO plays cello on this song.
                9. Still I’m Sad (Samwell-Smith, McCarty)
                  • An instrumental version of the song by the Yardbirds.
                  • Was originally the B-side of “Evil Hearted You” in the UK and “I’m a Man” in the US.  From the album “Having a Rave-Up with the Yardbirds.”
                    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhA_8VbM7Vw
                  • Opens with a “You Fool No One” style drum beat.
                  • Shoshana does backing vocals on this track as well.
                  • When done live it would have vocals.  Not sure why there were none on the album.
                The original line-up of British rock group Rainbow, Los Angeles, California, June 1975. Left to right: drummer Gary Driscoll (1946 – 1987), singer Ronnie James Dio (1942 – 2010), guitarist and songwriter Ritchie Blackmore, keyboard player Mickey Lee Soule and bassist Craig Gruber (1951 – 2015). (Photo by Fin Costello/Redferns/Getty Images)

                Album Review & Reception

                • This lineup of Rainbow never played a live gig.
                • Gruber and Dirscoll were fired during rehearsals.
                • Mickey Lee Soule resigned fearing he was next, leaving Blackmore and Dio as a duo.
                • Blackmore refused to have this album come out on Purple Records so a subsidiary called Oyster was created for its release. It would be released on Polydor in the US.
                • Dio considered this is favorite Rainbow album.
                • Album review from Circus Raves, September 1975.
                • Album review from Winnipeg Free Press, October 1975.

                This Week in Purple History . . .

                October 21 through October 27

                • October 21, 1921 – Sir Malcom Henry Arnold is born
                • October 24, 1971 – Roger Glover sings lead vocals for one show after Ian Gillan comes down with hepatitis
                • October 26, 1978 – Whitesnake begins their first ever tour of the UK

                For Further Information:

                Listener Mail/Comments

                • Comments about the show? Things you’d like us to cover?  We’d love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

                Episode #25 – Ian Gillan – Cherkazoo and Other Stories (Part 2)

                Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Breaker, PodBean, RadioPublic, or search in your favorite podcatcher! 

                Thanks to Our Patrons:

                • Clay Wombacher – $5 tier
                • Steve Seaborg (Alltheworldsastage.net) – $5 tier
                • Peter Gardow – $3 tier
                • Ells Murders – $1 tier
                • Spacey Noodles – $1 tier

                Thanks to our Brothers at the Deep Dive Podcast Network:

                Show Updates:

                • Comments from social media.
                • Nate hosted an episode of Skynyrd Reconsydrd which came out today. Check it out!
                • @jonatanhedlin on Instagram: “First episode I was worried going into, because I love this album so much. Luckily I was worried for no reason because you do get the magic that is Captain Beyonds first album.”

                Lead Up To Album & Writing:

                • With Cherkazoo Gillan shopped it around to Disney.  Gillan stated on his Caramba Web site:
                  •  “a meeting in the ‘70s with all the senior people at Disney.  I did a presentation at their studios in Hollywood and they were very enthusiastic.  However, it coincided with a sea change of company policy and they were in production with Robin Hood, having decided to go back to classic stories as the basis for their films, due to bad figures on some recent contemporary stuff.”
                • Fenwick remembered the Cherkazoo project (as written in Smoke on the Water by Dave Thompson, page 133-134):
                  • “At the time, it was kind of strange.  But it was one of those [projects] that you could see somewhere along the line, there was some connection.”
                  • Fenwick along with Moran would later be in in Ian Gillan Band.   Monster in Paradise was gifted to Hard Stuff, John Gustafson’s group, for their album “Bulletproof.”
                • “Other Stories” Recorded in 1974.
                • Parts of this are demos he was working on with Dave Wintour (worked with Rick Wakeman) on bass, Andy Steele (Peter Frampton) on drums, and Bernie Holland on guitar.
                • After leaving Deep Purple Ian Gillan purchased De Lane Lea Studios renaming it Kingsway Recorders.
                • Apart from recording other acts he could use the studio whenever he was in the mood to get back to some music.
                • In Spring of 1974 he got to the studio to record the second half of this compilation, finishing up the rest of the tracks in the fall.

                Album Lineup

                Album Details and Analysis:

                1. Trying To Get To You (Singleton/McCoy)
                  • Based on the Elvis Presley version of the song.
                    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZ64T6gEdC4
                  • Previously released version on a record called “For Gillan Fans Only” in 1980 which was given away free to accompany purchase of the “Glory Road” album release.
                  • This version is produced by Roger Glover.
                2. Ain’t That Loving You Baby (Reed)
                3. Driving Me Wild (Fast Take) (Gillan)
                  • Engineered by Martin Birch, Produced by Glover.
                4. Music in My Head (Gillan)
                  • Mike Moran on keys
                  • Dave Wintour on Bass
                  • Andy Steel on Drums
                  • Bernie Holland on guitar
                5. You Make Me Feel So Good (Gillan/Holland/Moran/Steele/Wintour)
                  • Would later be redone for “Child in Time.”
                  • Mike Moran on keys
                  • Dave Wintour on Bass
                  • Any Steel on Drums
                  • Bernie Holland on guitar
                6. She Called Me Softly (Gillan)
                  • Mike Moran on keys
                  • Dave Wintour on Bass
                  • Any Steel on Drums
                  • Bernie Holland on guitar
                7. Driving Me Wild (Take Three) (Gillan)
                  • Mike Moran on keys
                  • Dave Wintour on Bass
                  • Any Steel on Drums
                  • Bernie Holland on guitar
                8. You Led My Heart Astray (Gillan)
                  • A Little Share of Plenty (Gillan)
                    • Night and Day (Gillan/Holland/Moran/Steele/Wintour)

                      In The News . . .

                      • John will be attending the October 9, 2019 Deep Purple show at the Mohegan Sun in CT.
                      • Nate will be attending the October 18, 2019 Deep Purple show at the Rosemont Theater in Rosemont, IL.  If you’re attending give us a message on Twitter so we can say Hi.
                      • When was he asked?
                        • The Ultimate Guitar has quotes from an interview with Michael Schenker, in which he explains why he refused to join Deep Purple, Ozzy, Thin Lizzy, and Motorhead (spoiler: he didn’t want to end up in somebody else’s band).
                          • I didn’t go with Deep Purple, I didn’t go with Ozzy Osbourne, I didn’t go with Phil Lynott or Lemmy’s Motorhead – you name them, they all asked me to join them, but I did not think that I was the right person for that because there was a reason why I didn’t join the Scorpions, there was a reason why I left UFO.
                        • Here endeth the fact and starteth the speculation.
                        • One plausible theory is that his name was on the list of “acceptable replacements” for Blackmore, supplied to the band by Japanese promoters in order for the ’93 tour not to be cancelled. If so, it is quite possible that inquiries were made before the deal was struck with Joe Satriani.
                      • Interview: Glenn Hughes of THE DEAD DAISIES
                        • ANTIHERO: Your rescheduled ‘Glenn Hughes Performs Classic Deep Purple Live’ UK tour will be going ahead in November – do you envisage doing a tour of Trapeze songs too one day? 
                        • Glenn Hughes: I’d love to! I’m getting communications from promoters about that. I would love to do that – it would be bigger in America and I could find people who adore Trapeze, like Billy Gibbons who’s a huge Trapeze fan, so I don’t think I’d have a problem finding someone to play it with, but I’m glad you mentioned that band because that’s where it started for me and that’s where I found my legs. I’ve been doing this for fifty years now and it’s never going to really stop for me because I really love what I do and I love giving back to the people that follow my music.

                      This Week in Purple History . . .

                      October 14 through October 20

                      • October 16, 1968 – Deep Purple play their first US show opening for Cream for their farewell tour
                        • Video from show on October 18 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpmqIQlB4Lc
                      • October 16, 1975 – The Butterfly Ball is performed live at the Royal Albert Hall
                        • Great photo archive here: https://photofeatures.photoshelter.com/search?KW=Butterfly+Ball&I_DSC_AND=t&I_DSC=Butterfly+Ball+&I_USER_ID=U0000s1U9gi65hLg&_ACT=search
                      • October 14, 1991 – Gillan releases Toolbox

                      For Further Information:

                      Listener Mail/Comments

                      • Comments about the show? Things you’d like us to cover?  We’d love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

                      Episode #24 – Ian Gillan – Cherkazoo and Other Stories (Part 1)

                      Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Breaker, PodBean, RadioPublic, or search in your favorite podcatcher! 

                      Thanks to Our Patrons:

                      • Clay Wombacher – $5 tier
                      • Steve Seaborg (Alltheworldsastage.net) – $5 tier
                      • Peter Gardow – $3 tier
                      • Ells Murders – $1 tier
                      • Spacey Noodles – $1 tier

                      Thanks to our Brothers at the Deep Dive Podcast Network:

                      Show Updates:

                      • Comments from social media.
                      • Alice Gustafson on Twitter recommended the documentary “Some Other Guys” on Vimeo.  As well as a very touching tweet about her father:
                        • 5 years ago, the finest bass player to come out of Liverpool (fight me!) passed away. John Gustafson went on to join Roxy Music, writing the infamous bassline to Love Is The Drug. But to me, he was just ‘dad’. Raising a glass of red to you tonight
                        • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0n3OepDn5GU
                      • Lots of erroneous info about David Coverdale turning 70 yesterday (September 22) as we record this.  He actually is turning 68. @JoergPlaner traces this back to some incorrect newspaper articles from the 1980s crediting Coverdale as being two years older than he was,

                      Lead Up To Album & Writing:

                      • Recorded from 1972 to 1974.
                      • Essentially a collection of demos recorded by Ian Gillan in the 70s.
                      • They’d been available as poor quality bootlegs for years until Gillan approved of them being released after being stored in his garden shed for the better part of two decades.
                      • Parts of this are demos he was working on with Dave Wintour (worked with Rick Wakeman) on bass, Andy Steele (Peter Frampton) on drums, and Bernie Holland on guitar.
                      • The Cherkazoo project began in 1969.
                      • After Glover famously told Gillan he’d never talk to him again until he wrote a song. 
                      • Gillan began writing, if under duress, and eventually wrote so much material that Episode Six couldn’t record it all and he worked that creativity into Cherkazoo.
                      • Once in Deep Purple there just wasn’t enough time to work on the project.
                      • While in Deep Purple his only additional work was in Jesus Christ Superstar.
                      • In 1971 he dropped mention of the work in an interview where he explained that he was working on the project and that it was “… an animal, space, musical, travelogue fantasy.”
                      • Gillan then decided he wanted to turn this project into an animated children’s cartoon.
                      • He wrote dialogue, characters, and developed the music with Glover’s help.
                      • He brought it to film companies to see who would be interested.’
                      • As we stated in previous episodes it was mistakenly called “Chez Kazoo.”

                      Album Lineup

                      • Ian Gillan
                      • Pete York (possibly) – drums
                      • Roger Glover – guitar, bass
                      • Jon Lord – piano
                      • Marc Bolan of T. Rex (unconfirmed) – guitar
                      • Engineer – Martin Birch

                      Album Details and Analysis:

                      1. Intro
                      2. Cherkazoo (Gillan/Glover)
                      3. Monster in Paradise (Gillan/Glover/Gustafson)
                        • This song made it out on vinyl, recorded by Hard Stuff for the album Bulletproof.
                        • At the time it was assumed this was a leftover track that Deep Purple didn’t record and gave to the group.
                        • There were a number of odd versions with different singers doing cockney accents with spoken word bits.
                        • This was going to be left out until they uncovered this version featuring Glover on lead vocals with Gillan on the chorus.
                      4. The Bull of Birantis (Gilan/Glover)
                        • Liner notes state that the strings were performed by members of ELO.
                      5. Intro
                        • Jon Lord is laughing at hearing Ian Gillan sing “My Name’s Professor Pig.”
                        • Glover plays guitar.
                      6. Hogwash (Gillan/Glover)
                      7. Driving Me Wild
                      8. Donkey Ride Dream (Gillan/Glover)

                        Album Review & Reception

                        • Full track list includes:
                          • Overture
                          • Cherkazoo
                          • What’s New Finnegan
                          • Gentle Meadow
                          • Hogwash
                          • The Bull of Birantis
                          • Driving Me Wild
                          • Monster in Paradise
                          • Donkey Ride Dream
                          • Fight Scene
                          • Lady Fair
                        • Additional Tracks:
                          • Meadowland
                          • Brother of Mine
                          • High ‘n Mighty Woman
                          • Described in the liner notes as “lacklustre country and western efforts” found at the end of one of the reels without Ian Gillan on vocals.  Unclear if they were intended to be part of this.
                        • The liner notes state that this wasn’t meant to recreate the Cherkazoo project, merely to present a collection of Gillan’s demos.  They also state that completists will want answers as to why the other tracks were left off (other than a boring one like the lack of room!).
                        • Liner notes state that Overture, Fight Scene, and Gentle Meadow are instrumentals.
                        • Lady fair is an orchestral number with a choral refrain.
                        • What’s New Finnegan has vocals but not by Ian and “didn’t really make the grade.”

                        In The News . . .

                        • Jon Lord – Windows vinyl reissue: a closer look
                          • On September 27, 2019 earMusic will continue the series of Jon Lord vinyl re-releases with “Windows”, an album featuring a cooperation between Jon Lord and conductor and composer Eberhard Schoener. Schoener, who was also involved in progressive rock masterpieces like “The Turn of a Friendly Card” by The Alan Parsons Project may also be known for being the creator of the main theme for the TV series “Derrick“.
                          • “Windows” was recorded live at the Herkulessaal in Munich on June 1st, 1974 as closing performance of the “Prix Jeunesse International” festival under the “Rock meets Classic” banner and was broadcasted by German TV station Bayerischer Rundfunk to a potential audience of 300 million people.
                          • The album consists of two parts, the 18 minute piece “Continuo on B.A.C.H.” and the name-giving 32 minute “Window” (without “s”), both composed by Jon Lord and Eberhard Schoener.

                        This Week in Purple History . . .

                        October 7 through October 13

                        • October 10, 1975 – Come Taste The Band original release date (delayed)
                        • October 7, 1977 – Ian Gillan Band releases Scarabus
                        • October 8, 2001 – Joe Lynn Turner releases Slam

                        For Further Information:

                        Listener Mail/Comments

                        • Comments about the show? Things you’d like us to cover?  We’d love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

                        Episode #23 – Captain Beyond – Captain Beyond

                        This episode has been blocked on YouTube. 🙁

                        Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Google Podcasts,

                        Overcast, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Breaker, PodBean, RadioPublic, or search in your favorite podcatcher! 

                        Thanks to Our Patrons:

                        • Clay Wombacher – $5 tier
                        • Steve Seaborg (Alltheworldsastage.net) – $5 tier
                        • Peter Gardow – $3 tier
                        • Ells Murders – $1 tier
                        • Spacey Noodles – $1 tier

                        Thanks to our Brothers at the Deep Dive Podcast Network:

                        Show Updates:

                        • Comments from social media.
                        • Thanks to Jonatan Hedlin on Facebook who provided this interview clip which explains Martin Birch’s nickname as “The Farmer.”  https://youtu.be/nV6Cc9HjlXI?t=480
                        • Comment on the Stormbringer episode on our website from Paris
                          • Here at Foot Fetish Lovers you’ll discover many of user profiles of women who like to brag their cute feet and cute toes. whether donning hot stiletto heels or going barefoot, our members love to transfer pictures that may satisfy any foot deviant. Some relish having their feet and toes tickled, licked, and sucked, or need to satisfy a man mistreatment their feet alone! marsha may foot fetish and sakura foot worship
                        • Bernie Marsden – The Postman – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnPxwtbOYnM

                        Lead Up To Album & Writing:

                        • Reinhardt and Dorman were wrapping up their time with Iron Butterfly in 1971.  They knew that the band would be ending after that tour. They were in contact with Bobby Caldwell who was playing the same places as them with Johnny Winter who was going to be taking a six month hiatus so they talked to him about working on a project.
                        • Lee Dorman financed the project and they were interested in going in a jazz/rock direction.  They jammed together for a few weeks then began looking for a singer.
                        • Through their old manager they found out that Rod Evans was available so they contacted him and recorded some demos together.
                        • They got together and recorded the album in two days because they’re rehearsed it so much and gotten it so tight.
                        • Rhino says in an interview: “Lee and I played with Bobby and it just clicked, we wanted to do something totally different and just the way Bobby plays makes it totally different. Chris Squire from Yes came one morning to me, when we were uploading the bus and said to me “you guys look like Captain Beyond!”
                        • Lee Dorman: “… when we were on that european tour of Iron Butterfly in 71, we were travelling with Yes, with whom we did the tour and there was a strike by Lufthansa, so we had to chart a airplane by a company named “General Air”. A game of words started and suddenly, we were on a bus late one night, someone said “Captain Beyond”, we thought it sounded good and kept it…”
                        • All songs are credited to Rod Evans and Bobby Caldwell.
                        • The songs were actually written by the entire group but Larry Reinhardt and Lee Dorman could not be listed due to their contract with Iron Butterfly.
                        • The Album contains of three medleys.  The first three tracks on the first side, the first three tracks on the second side, and the last five tracks on the second side.
                        • The album was dedicated to Duane Allman who had played with drummer Bobby Caldwell.

                        Album Lineup

                        • Rod Evans – lead vocals
                        • Larry “Rhino” Reinhardt – guitars
                          • Started with The Thunderbeats
                          • Played with Iron Butterfly
                          • Passed away in 2012
                        • Lee Dorman – bass guitar, backing vocals, piano
                          • Bass player in Iron Butterfly
                          • Passed away in December of 2012
                        • Bobby Caldwelldrums, all percussion instruments (including bells and vibraphone), backing vocals, piano
                          • Played with Johnny Winter and Rick Derringer
                          • Also played with John Lennon, Ringo Starr, and Eric Clapton
                          • Still actively playing and living in Florida

                        They previously played with a keyboardist, Lewie Gold, but he left before they recorded the first album.

                        Album Art & Booklet Review

                        • The album cover contained 3D artwork using lenticular printing on the US release.
                        • The crystal ball Captain Beyond is holding contains the earthsign symbols of fire and water.
                        • Album concept and design by Pacific Eye & Ear
                        • Illustration by Joe Garnett – the artist who did the Stormbringer album cover

                        Album Details and Analysis:

                        • Recorded at Sunset Sound Recorders in Hollywood, CA.
                        • Mixed at The Record Plant in Los Angeles
                        • Engineered by Wayne Dailey
                        • Produced by Captain Beyond

                        Side One:

                        1. Dancing Madly Backwards (on a Sea of Air)
                          • Armworth
                            • Myopic Void
                              • Mesmerization Eclipse
                                • Raging River of Fear

                                  Side Two:

                                  1. Thousand Days of Yesterdays (Intro)
                                    • Frozen Over
                                      • Thousand Days of Yesterdays (Time Since Come and Gone)
                                        • I Can’t Feel Nothin’ (Part 1)
                                          • As The Moon Speas (to the Waves of the Sea)
                                            • Astral Lady
                                              • As The Moon Speaks (Return)
                                                • I Can’t Feel Nothin’ (Part 2)

                                                  Album Review & Reception

                                                  • The president of Capricorn, their label, also managed the band.  Southern rock bands were becoming very popular at the time and according to Lee Dorman, Captain Beyond got pushed to the back burner.
                                                  • With Rod they only played about 60-70 gigs in the two years he was with the band.
                                                  • Live they played all the song from the first album except “Raging River of Fear” and “Thousand Days of Yesterday (Time Since Come and Gone).”

                                                  In The News . . .

                                                  • Heavy metal and classical music have more in common than you think
                                                    • Take Deep Purple’s Ritchie Blackmore, for example. A self-professed classical music fan, many of his works in the ’60s were modelled on classical examples. 
                                                    • “I still listen to a great deal of classical music,” he said in 1985. “That’s the type of music that moves me because I find it very dramatic. Singers, violinists and organists are generally the musicians I enjoy listening to most of all.” If you listen to both Jon Lord’s keyboard solo and Blackmore’s guitar solo on Deep Purple’s “Highway Star,” both are distinctly Bach-like in harmonic progression and virtuosic arpeggio figuration.

                                                  This Week in Purple History . . .

                                                  September 30 through October 6

                                                  • October 1, 1973 – Billy Cobham’s “Spectrum” is released
                                                  • October 5, 1990 – Deep Purple’s “Slaves and Masters” is released

                                                  For Further Information:

                                                  Listener Mail/Comments

                                                  • Comments about the show? Things you’d like us to cover?  We’d love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

                                                  Epiosde #22 – Warhorse – Warhorse

                                                  Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Breaker, PodBean, RadioPublic, or search in your favorite podcatcher! 

                                                  Thanks to Our Patrons:

                                                  • Clay Wombacher – $5 tier
                                                  • Steve Seaborg (Alltheworldsastage.net) – $5 tier
                                                  • Peter Gardow – $3 tier
                                                  • Ells Murders – $1 tier

                                                  Show Updates:

                                                  • Comments from social media.
                                                  • Apple Podcasts Reviews!
                                                    • 5 Stars! Bogue Herb Lives, 08/19/2019 – Mark 3!
                                                      • It took me awhile to warm up to the podcast. I’m a big Purple fan but Mark 1 leaves me cold. However, when the show about the concerto popped up I started to get interested. Then Mark 2 and the five great albums. Now for the cream: Mark 3. The Burn episode was great and now I’m chomping at the bit to hear Nathan and John’s take on my favorite DP album, Stormbringer! Keep up the good work guys. Great format and knowledge. Good to hear real fans talk about this great band.
                                                    • 5 Stars! 08/27/2019 – A Deeper Purple….
                                                      • These two guys are not held to the conventional notions of the band…..and that’s a very good thing! If you’re not afraid to look outside the more conventional realms of “Machine Head” and “Made In Japan”, this podcast gives another listen to some underrated periods of Purpledom!
                                                    • LDeepBoogie , 09/07/2019 – Finally a Podcast on Deep Purple
                                                      • I’ve been waiting for a podcast on this band forever! Great information by two old friends discussing classic albums by the band and discovering new material! If you have any interest in DP you need to check this out!
                                                    • BLCKSBBTH , 09/07/2019 – They said something very important
                                                      • This became my favorite podcast when they called attention to the fact that DP’s concerto was composed (by J Lord) as an organic interlocking of rock band and ochestra, whereas S&M is Metallica playing greatest hits with strings added. I can’t beleive it took 20 years for someone to call attention to this publicly.
                                                  • Lo Axelsson on YouTube:
                                                    • My feeling is that many older men are just as bad as teenagers. “Fun” story related to your podcast:
                                                    • I was in a record store looking at a copy of Shades of Deep Purple when the owner comes up to me and goes “ah, Deep Purple with their ORIGINAL singer, he’s MUCH better than the other one!” (I’m assuming he meant Gillan, rip Coverdale etc.). Anyway, I got annoyed by his disdainful tone and answered that Rod Evans is great but that I much prefer him in Captain Beyond. By the bewildered look on his face and lack of response, I conclude he didn’t know of them. I sealed my victory in this pretentious record store pissing contest by buying Fireball. (I am a 30 something woman btw)
                                                    • I felt he didn’t have to know I had actually only just learned about Captain Beyond through your podcast and found a record by them at my dad’s and think it’s fantastic :p
                                                  • Ritchie fixing a TV.
                                                    • @JoergPlaner comes through with the magazine article confirming it is a TV.
                                                    • Ritchie spent time in his teens working as a radio technician at Heathrow airport.
                                                  • Jim Massa on YouTube:
                                                    • If you look at the cover of MIJ, look on the left side of the Hammond (Jon’s left), that is a ring modulator/phaser unit. It is that which created all those effects for Lazy, Space Trucking. . He did not add a synth (ARP Odyssey) until 1973 shows (WDWTWA).
                                                    • Jim also tells a great story of meeting Ritchie and having drinks with him during the  Rainbow tour and getting VIP tickets.

                                                  Lead Up To Album & Writing:

                                                  • After being fired from Deep Purple he joined Marsha Hunt’s band, White Trash.
                                                  • After a few gigs NIck Simper felt the band wasn’t performing well and he was tasked with finding replacements.
                                                  • He got Ged Peck who he’d toured with in The Flowerpot Men on guitar.
                                                  • He also got Roger Pinner (aka Roger Truth) on drums who he’d worked with in The Pirates.  He was replaced soon after with Mac Poole.
                                                  • During this time Nick Simper was also playing with The James Royal Set as well as putting together Warhorse as a side project.
                                                  • Ashley Hunt was also recruited having formerly auditioned for Deep Purple in 1968.
                                                  • Rick Wakeman joined on keys having played with Simper in the James Royal Set.
                                                  • Wakeman was on the fence about the project and was eventually replaced with Frank Wilson.
                                                  • Marsha Hunt became pregnant and folded the group and they basically just continued on as Warhorse.
                                                  • Soon after this they got a record contract with the new label Vertigo and recorded the Warhorse album.
                                                  • They made their live debut as a support group for Mott The Hoople in Hemel Hempstead.
                                                  • The Warhorse album was released in November of 1970.
                                                  • Warhorse was managed by Ron Hire who was a part of HEC Enterprises who financed the original version of Deep Purple.

                                                  Album Lineup

                                                  • Ashley Holt – vocals
                                                  • Ged Peck – guitar
                                                    • Worked with Billy Fury, Tommy Quickly (when he was managed by Brian Epstein), the Flower Pot Men, Screaming Lord Sutch
                                                  • Mac Poole – drums
                                                  • Nick Simper – bass
                                                  • Frank Wilson – keyboards

                                                  Album Art & Booklet Review

                                                  Album Details and Analysis:

                                                  1. Vulture Blood
                                                  2. No Chance
                                                  3. Burning
                                                  4. St. Louis
                                                    • Cover of a song by Easybeats; written by George Young and Harry Vanda.
                                                    • Released as a single and failed to chart.
                                                    • Read that Deep Purple had done this in their early set until dropping it around 1969.  In an interview with Nick Simper in DMME he denies Deep Purple ever played this song.
                                                  5. Ritual
                                                  6. Solitude
                                                  7. Woman of the Devil

                                                  Album Review & Reception

                                                  • Could not find any reviews of the album contemporary to the release.
                                                  • Album was re-released in 1984 as “Vulture Blood.”

                                                  This Week in Purple History . . .

                                                  September 23 through September 29

                                                  • September 24, 1969 – Deep Purple performs the Concerto for Group and Orchestra live for the first time.
                                                  UNIVERSAL CITY, CA – 1987: The rock group, “Whitesnake,” poses on the red carpet at the 1987 Universal City, California, MTV Music Awards. (Photo by George Rose/Getty Images)
                                                  • September 26, 1990 – David Coverdale quits Whitesnake!
                                                  • September 25, 1999 – Deep Purple performs the Concerto for Group and Orchestra for the first time since 1970.

                                                  For Further Information:

                                                  Listener Mail/Comments

                                                  • Comments about the show? Things you’d like us to cover?  We’d love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

                                                  Episode #21 – The End & Mark 1-4 Wrap Up

                                                  Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Breaker, PodBean, RadioPublic, or search in your favorite podcatcher! 

                                                  Show Updates:

                                                  • Comments from social media.
                                                  • Trinkelbonker (Michael Eriksson) interview with Dan McCafferty of Nazareth from 1989:
                                                    • DRUGS (TOMMY BOLIN/JIMI HENDRIX)
                                                    • – We may not have been angels but we always avoided the hard stuff. We toured with Deep Purple in the States in 1976 and I worried about Tommy Bolin. He was a beautiful man and a good guitarist but he did not want to listen to people that warned him about that shit. I tried to talk to him and he said “Jimi Hendrix did it and look how good he was”. I said, “But Tommy, Jimi is dead!”. I actually saw Hendrix early on and it was way better than the last time I had a chance to see him. Tommy Bolin was one of these guys that this business just eats up. It was a good tour for us, we did better than Purple really.
                                                  • Sleepfan on YouTube points out that “Sunset Ride” was NOT a Tommy Bolin album!
                                                  • Bolin writing credits on James Gang’s “Bang” album – accidentally credited him as having writing credits on four tracks when actually he wrote/co-wrote eight tracks.
                                                  • Jim Massa on YouTube says, “Hey guys, I noticed you haven’t done a Machine Head episode yet!”
                                                  • Chris Schild on Twitter mentions that he heard that Tommy Bolin’s picture of his head has been copies into an older shot of the band for the cover of Jame Gang’s “Bang” album.
                                                  • A LOT of love for Stormbringer and for Tommy Bolin!

                                                  Thanks to Our Patrons:

                                                  • Clay Wombacher – $5 tier
                                                  • Steve Seaborg (Alltheworldsastage.net) – $5 tier
                                                  • Peter Gardow – $3 tier
                                                  • Ells Murders – $1 tier

                                                  The End of Mark 4 and Deep Purple:

                                                  • The work that Bolin did on the album had it carried to the live shows could have put fans’ longing for Blackmore to rest.  However, their live set was instead disjointed and inconsistent.
                                                  • “Come Taste The Band” is often forgotten or dismissed.
                                                  • Hughes says during the live set they’d be on stage for an hour and 45 minutes and Coverdale would be off stage for about 45 minutes with the band jamming and Hughes singing.
                                                  • Coverdale states that he thought the band members had all become spineless.  They could see the wheels coming off but they felt powerless to do anything about it.
                                                  • In an interview with Tony Stewart in 1976: “I refuse to stand on stage with Glenn while he’d doin his bloody ‘Georgia On My Mind,’ and I’m standing there in the dark saying, ‘C’mon, get it out of your system.  Where’s the band? C‘Mon, Tommy, get it out, c’mon Jon do your classical bits’ – and I’d go off and have a cigarette. Where’s that at? That ain’t no …. Band. Then Ian turns round and says ‘Dave, stop bellowing so much.’ I got that gig on the strength of my talent.  Nobody did me a favour. Those cats wanted me to work. Like, I’ve got the good to do it, and up to now people have only heard one facet of my talent.”
                                                  • After recording the album Hughes went to rehab for the first time but it wasn’t successful.
                                                  • The band’s management was very worried about Hughes going on tour with his problem.  They decided his test gig to see if he was ready was the live performance of The Butterfly Ball.  If he could make it through that he’d be allowed to tour with the band.
                                                  • He gave a good performance then says he got loaded immediately after the show.
                                                  • They then went off to New Zealand on the “no drugs” tour and Hughes says for six weeks they were clean and everything was great.
                                                  • They flew to Jakarta where they were received by tens of thousands of fan.  Two nights playing to crowds of 10-15,000 turned into 125,000 per night in a venue the size of Wembley Stadium. The band would have made ~ $1million for two nights.
                                                  • The promoter for the gigs had as security the Indonesian military.  Capacity for the venues would have been well below the total number of tickets sold, less than half.  People were crammed in.
                                                  • Two girls showed up at Hughes’ room sent by the promoters of the show.
                                                  • Hughes in his book: “Thank God Blackmore wasn’t still with us or there would have been a riot.”
                                                  • Very scary scene with military and dogs keeping the fans at bay.  Band was very nervous and decided to do shorter sets.
                                                  • After the show Patsy Collins, one of the road crew, got in an altercation with one of the girls in Glenn’s room.  Glenn says he walked out of the room after Patsy stormed out and it was silent, no one was there.
                                                  • The next morning people came in Glenn’s room at 7:30am.  They said Patsy had fallen down an elevator shaft, stumbled into the lobby and died.  Glenn, along with other road crew were taken into custody.
                                                  • He was let out for the second show, handed his bass by a security guard with a gun and watched during the entire set.
                                                  • The army let dogs loose on the crowd during the set and the band ended up playing a short set.
                                                  • They went back to jail and were going to be held when all of a sudden a couple of girls came forward and told the authorities that they’d seen Patsy open the wrong door.  They were off the hook and free to go.
                                                  • Hughes suspects that the girls send to the room were sent to get Patsy out of the room to cause problems for the band.
                                                  • The theory the management had is that the band was being discredited as a way to get out of paying them for the shows.  The band was never paid.
                                                  • When they went to leave the country the tires of their plane had been slashed.  They needed to pay extra money to get new tires but the airport people weren’t allowed to help so they had to use the co-pilot and some roadies to change the tires.
                                                  • Years later, in the late 90s, they had an offer to play in Indonesia.  Jon Lord refused to go because of the painful memories.
                                                  • In Japan Tommy Bolin “slept” on his arm and pinched a nerve and was barely able to play.
                                                  • They recorded “Last Concert in Japan” and in they were all really drunk on mai tais and pina coladas.  Hughes says you can see him about to throw up on the video.
                                                  • Hughes in his book talks about how ashamed he was of the performance.  They were all drunk and Tommy couldn’t even play.
                                                  • They couldn’t return to UK because they couldn’t be in the country for more than 30 days a year for tax purposes.
                                                  • They rehearsed for an american tour and took a DC9  from LA to North Carolina. It was the same DC9 that killed Lynyrd Skynyrd members.
                                                  • At a point Tommy didn’t even want to get high with Hughes anymore.  Hughes was finding dealers and getting high alone because he was so paranoid.
                                                  • Bonzo pulled a gun on Hughes after a show because he’d heard that he was involved with his wife.  Luckily they ironed things out and then went and got wasted.
                                                  • The last time Bonzo saw him he snuck up on Glenn and said, “So you fancy your chance, do yer?” and punched Hughes in the mouth chipping a tooth.
                                                  • The next night someone tried to give Hughes some coke and Bob Cooksey (who’d been hired to keep Hughes straight) punched him out.  The next day Hughes said he realized how good he could performa if he was in shape.
                                                  • Hughes was using uppers to lose weight and dealing with full blown cocaine psychosis.  Tells story of calling a hotel manager to say there was a man in a yellow hat trying to break into his room.  His room was on the 24th floor.
                                                  • Hughes said everyone expected him to die.  His parents expected that every phone call would be someone telling them he’d died.
                                                  • They played their last US show with Tommy and Glenn tried to skip out on the flight back to the UK but he was essentially thrown onto the plane.
                                                  • Hughes tells story of sleeping for 3-4 days straight, waking up in a cold sweat, eating whatever he could, and going back to sleep.
                                                  • Hughes could stay awake for up to a week at a time.  From March 10 through March 15 1976 he didn’t sleep.
                                                  • March 15 was the day that Deep Purple broke up.  Hughes says he couldn’t play well. Lord had to drag him on stage on the 15th.  Hughes says it was his lowest point in Purple. The band had abandoned him. He was staying by himself.  He says it was a miracle that he made it to those gigs at all.
                                                  • Bolin was being berated by Blackmore fans.
                                                  • The end came on tour in England on 15 March 1976 at the Liverpool Empire Theatre. In the words of Jon Lord:
                                                    • At one point during the show, Glenn said to the audience, “I’m sorry we’re not playing very well, but we’re very tired and jet-lagged.” And I remember spluttering to myself, “Speak for yourself.” I was working like a Trojan to try and make this work … Paicey was playing like a madman just to keep it all together … Coverdale was singing his socks off. So to hear this guy who was extremely high on various substances telling the audience, “I’m sorry, We aren’t playing well” kind of rankled me a bit. I came off stage and went straight to my dressing room, which I was sharing with Ian Paice, and I said, “Ian … that’s it, isn’t it? That’s absolutely the end of this band as far as I’m concerned. Why are we doing this to ourselves?” So he and I shook hands and said, “It’s over. Thank God.” About ten minutes later, Coverdale came in, big blustery guy that he is, and he said, “I’m leaving the band!” And we said, “David, there’s no band to leave.”
                                                    • From Gettin’ Tighter – The Story Of Deep Purple Mark 3 & 4.
                                                  • Hughes says he didn’t want to continue making the music that Purple was making.  He wanted to work on his solo album, Play Me Out. His relationship with Vicky Gibbs had broken up (Jon Lord’s wife, and twin sister of Ian Paice’s wife Jacky).  The album is mostly about her.
                                                  • Coverdale was talking to Hughes at Ian Paice’s wedding about working on a solo album too.  Only Glenn didn’t know that he’d left Purple. Management hadn’t told him.
                                                  • There was no talk of trying to press on.  It was over.
                                                  • Glenn gets back with Trapeze.
                                                  • Bolin introduced Tommy to Linda Blair.
                                                  • Trapeze kicked him out because he was so messed up.
                                                  • He ended up moving in with Karen, Tommy’s ex-girlfriend.  They later married
                                                  • On December 4, 1976 Glenn got a call that Tommy had died.  He and Karen had received a post card from him the day before saying he’d see them at Christmas.

                                                  Mark 3 & 4 Bonus Tracks:

                                                  • Review of unreleased Mk 3 & Mk 4 materia.
                                                  1. Coronarias Redig
                                                  2. Highball Shooter (Instrumental)
                                                  3. Same in L.A.
                                                  4. Bolin/Paice Jam

                                                  Mark 1-4 Wrap Up

                                                  Listener Questions:

                                                  • Chrisl @inkpen111 on Twitter asks:
                                                    • What is the Purple song you could happily never hear again?
                                                    • What if Paul Rodgers had actually joined the band?
                                                    • What if there had been another Purple LP after CTTB?
                                                  • @StratCars on Twitter asks:
                                                    • What was the best song DP (all lineups) used as a concert opener?
                                                    • Why the Hammond Organ was such a vital part of DP.
                                                  • Tim @trzasa on Twitter asks:
                                                    • What if Glenn Hughes had been in Mark 2?
                                                  • @murray_bulger on Twitter asks:
                                                    • What if Hughes and Bolin didn’t do drugs?
                                                    • What if Hughes played more rock than funk?
                                                    • What if Mark 2,3,4 didn’t break up and one line up kept going to last 70s into 80s?
                                                    • What if Ian Paice played more double kick?
                                                    • What if Peter Grand (legendary Led Zeppelin manager) was manager of Deep Purple?
                                                    • What if Ian Paice could sing?  And sang a song like Bill Ward Sang “It’s All Right.”
                                                    • What if Blackmore liked funk going into the late 70s? Would Purple have turned to a disco-rock band?
                                                  • @Dannymd71 on Twitter asks:
                                                    • I’ve heard that Roger Glover really happened to be brought into the band by chance because he tagged along with Ian Gillan for his audition/jam.  What do you think would’ve happened if he weren’t in the band (at least initially)? Would Nick Simper have stayed longer?

                                                  In The News . . .

                                                  This Week in Purple History . . .

                                                  September 16 through September 22

                                                  • September 22, 1951 – David Coverdale is born
                                                  • September 22, 1977 – Ian Gillan Band record “Live at the Budokan”
                                                  • September 19, 2002 – Jon Lord’s last show with Deep Purple

                                                  For Further Information:

                                                  Listener Mail/Comments

                                                  • Comments about the show? Things you’d like us to cover?  We’d love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.