Episode #76 – Hughes/Thrall

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Show Updates:

Lead up to the Album:

  • Hughes had spent the most of the five years in heavy drug use, feeling uninspired, and still grieving the death of Tommy Bolin.
  • There was a brief Trapeze reunion.  Hughes had also done vocals on 2 tracks on their 1975 self-titled album while still in Deep Purple.
  • There was a small tour with Hughes back in Trapeze but Hughes’s drug problem got in the way and the band had considered firing him before it completely fell apart.  The trio recorded “L.A. Cut Off” and “Space High” during this reunion which were both eventually used on 1977’s “Play Me Out.”
  • Galley on Hughes: “[he] wasn’t in a good state of mind at the time”, suggesting that “if we could have carried the electricity of those shows on, we could have known no bounds”.
  • Tony Perry (Trapeze’s manager) on Hughes: “[had] major problems at the time and was very difficult to deal with”, adding that he and the other members of the band had discussed the possibility of firing and replacing him during the tour.
  • Hughes:
    • Hughes’s bio on the Hughes/Thrall site states this about his time after Play Me Out: “Shortly thereafter, Hughes settled in Los Angeles where he could write, relax and wait for the right moment to jump back in.”
    • “I had been bored to death for five years,” Hughes affirms today. “So, yes, thank God the formation of Hughes/Thrall came about.”
    • “When Tommy died it was difficult for me,” says the Cannock, Staffordshire-born Hughes. “I was still in my dark period. From March or April 1976 when Purple broke up, to August 1981 when Hughes/Thrall began to take shape, I was definitely just hanging out rather than working. That five-year period”¦ I hate to use the word hiatus, but that’s what it was. I wasn’t interested in doing very much at all.”
    • But then Hughes fell firmly off the radar. One of his first attempts at a comeback revolved around a supergroup comprising himself, fusion guitarist Ray Gomez and R&B/soul star Narada Michael Walden. The trio was supposed to sign with Atlantic Records but Gomez opted for a solo deal with Columbia instead. (Nevertheless, Hughes continued to work on and off with Gomez, while keeping his options open.)
    • “Besides the so-called “supergoup’ you mention, me and Gary Moore tried to do an album with [Elf, Thin Lizzy and Ian Gillan Band drummer] Mark Nauseef, called G-Force. But that was aborted in 1980 ““ for numerous reasons. Sharon [Osbourne] was managing us.”
    • That he once claimed to have fired himself from G-Force ““ on his birthday, no less ““ says a lot about Hughes’s state of mind at the time. Moore’s new outfit continued on without him, recording a single album for Jet Records, but with false starts aplenty it really did seem as if Glenn’s career was going nowhere fast.
    • Hughes: “At the beginning of the 80s I went to see Def Leppard open for Pat Travers at the Santa Monica Civic. It was Travers together with “Mars’ Cowling [bass], Tommy Aldridge [drums] and Pat Thrall. And I saw first-hand what Travers was talking about when he told me: “You’ve got to see my new guitar player, Pat Thrall.’ The two were sharing lead guitar duties. Immediately after the show I said to Pat Thrall: “Do you want to form a band with me?’ Because I just loved what he was doing.”
    • “I enjoy things that are totally out of the box ““ particularly after the experience of playing with Tommy [Bolin], which was total fusion in some respects. I’ve always wanted to work with people who’re a little on the edge, a little different. When we put Hughes/Thrall together we immediately had all these amazing signatures and this great sound. As a trio [drums being supplied by a varying cast including Gary Ferguson, Gary Mallaber, Peter Schless and Frankie Banali] we sounded huge. Pat had his synthesiser guitar back then, and we had this amazing depth to pull from. We wrote a lot of material. We were in pre-production for maybe six months before we went into the studio.”
    •  
  • Thrall:
    • “I was aware of Glenn from Purple, but the first time I really heard him was when I was hanging with Pat Travers and he put on the Play Me Out album. Travers plays on it; he was very proud to be a part of Glenn’s record. I was hugely impressed by Play Me Out. At that point I thought: “Great, I’m starting out with Travers now, but at some point I know I’m going to be playing with Glenn Hughes.'”
    • Thrall, however, remembers the events leading up to the formation of Hughes/Thrall a little differently: “After I left Travers’s band I got in touch with Glenn to see what he was doing and he said: “I’ve already got something going with Ray Gomez.’ So I went up to the San Francisco Bay Area, where my family is and where I grew up, and I started a band with my brother.
    • “About four months later I got a call from Foreigner’s manager, Bud Prager. He said he was concerned because it wasn’t working out with Glenn and Gomez. Apparently Prager had invested a lot of his own money into the project and it wasn’t going anywhere. Prager knew Glenn had expressed an interest in working with me, but I thought his [Prager’s] approach was kind of disrespectful. He wanted me to haul my ass down to LA, and spend a lot of my own money on rehearsal studios, demos and suchlike. Prager implied that, in the unlikely event of things working out between me and Glenn, if I was lucky he might take us on.
    • “But all I cared about was playing with Glenn, so I moved to LA and we began working together regardless. Eventually Prager came into town, and when he heard what we were doing he flipped out and wanted to sign us. But I wasn’t so sure because of his attitude, and because of the way he’d approached me initially. So Glenn and I decided not to get involved with Prager, although obviously he did play a role in bringing us together.”
  • Pat Thrall got his start in a band called Go with Steve Winwood.  There’s a connection there to Spencer Davis Group.  This band also included Michael Shrieve and the two of them formed another project called Automatic Man.
  • Thrall did a lot of studio work and eventually this got him the job with the Pat Travers band.  With Travers he did three albums: Heat In The Street, Go For What You Know and Crash And Burn. The last album had the hit song “Snortin’ Whiskey and Drinkin’ Cocaine” co-written by Thrall and Travers.
  • The work with Pat Travers band earned him the “Best New Talent” award in 1980 by Guitar Player Magazine.
  • All this attention got him noticed by Hughes and they formed the band in 1981.

Personnel

  • Drums – Frankie Banali
  • Drums – Gary Ferguson
  • Drums – Gary Mallaber
  • Guitar, Guitar Synthesizer – Pat Thrall
    • Jack of all trades: vocals, guitar, production.
    • Played guitar with Cookin Mama with his brother Preston Thrall on drums.
    • Was in the Pat Travers band.
    • Was in the band Automatic Man.
    • Also played with Asia and Meatloaf.
    • Was on the Glenn Hughes solo album “Feel.”
    • Also played bass on the Joe Satriani album “Engines of Creation.”
    • Also worked with Stevie Wonder and Celine Dion.
    • Known as being an early adopter of Pro Tools.
    • Worked with Demi Lovato on her version of “Let it Go” from the Frozen soundtrack.
  • Keyboards – Peter Schless
    • Worked with Dr. John, Kenny Loggins, Jeffrey Osbourne.
  • Vocals, Bass – Glenn Hughes
  • Written-By – G. Hughes*, P. Thrall*

Album Art & Booklet Review

  • Steve Carver
    • Kansas, Rufus with Chaka Kahn, and the Beach Boys
  • Matt Mahurin
  • John Lykes
    • Work for Sun Ra and Doc Severinsen
  • Earl Keleny
    • Hughes/Thrall is only credit.
  • Nick Taggart
    • Loggins and Messina, Richard Pryor, Bernadette Peters, John Hiatt
  • Andy Zito
  • Lettering by Margo Nahas
    • Did work for Stevie Wonder, Toto, and Van Halen’s 1984 album.
  • Promo Photos
    • Nevertheless, the promo photos that accompanied the release of Hughes/Thrall in 1982 showed the duo not as raddled rockers, but as remarkably healthy and fresh-faced individuals ““ even though they also looked like cheesy extras out of the soap opera, Dynasty.
    • Thrall laughs: “Those pictures were very much of their time. I guess we were trying to look as good as we could, but believe me we were not living a very healthy lifestyle.”
    • Hughes: “I was really healthy when we started the Hughes/Thrall project and I lost a lot of weight; I was very California-looking. But unfortunately it didn’t last”¦”
  • Thrall on album cover:
    • “It’s one of the worst in the history of rock,” he laughs again. “They gave us two choices. The other choice was a scantily clad woman riding on the back of a dinosaur. They said: “Which do you want, the masks or the dinosaur?’ We said: “I guess we’re going have to go with the stoopid masks.’ If you ever saw the video for The Look In Your Eye ““ ha-ha! ““ the director had everyone holding up those damn masks. It’s awful.”

Technical:

  • United Western Studios, Hollywood, California, USA & Shangri-La Studios, Malibu, California, USA
  • Producer – Andy Johns
    • Worked with Free, Jack Bruce, and Rod Stewart.
    • Over 500 entries on Discogs.
  • Producer – Hughes / Thrall
  • Producer – Rob Fraboni
    • http://robfraboni.com/
    • Worked with Bob Dylan, The Rolling Stones, The Band, Eric Clapton, Keith Richards, The Beach Boys, and Bonnie Raitt.
    • The producer on Hughes/Thrall was initially Rob Fraboni. But it didn’t work out.
    • Thrall: “Rob worked on Hughes/Thrall in the evening and into the night, but during the day he was producing Bonnie Raitt’s album Green Light. He’s more oriented toward that kind of music. We’d done probably four songs with Rob when we realised we needed to get a bigger sound. So we brought in Andy Johns, because of Led Zeppelin and all the stuff he’d done. You can definitely hear that bigger sound ““ particularly with the drums ““ on tracks such as Muscle & Blood and I Got Your Number. So that’s why we made the change. It was an education working with Andy because of his history ““ he’s a star in his own right, basically.”
    • Hughes expands: “I really wanted Andy because of the work he’d done with Free, The Rolling Stones and Led Zeppelin, of course. Andy’s a wild card, a six-foot-four Brit in California. He wears a cowboy hat, has been known to carry guns from time to time, and he was larger than life. He still is. He was massive character in the studio. He was great at fixing the stew”¦ although he’d probably call it making the sauce!
    • “Andy was very good at combining Pat and me’s vibe together. The groove was very important to Andy, that great groove that carries on through the record, from Muscle & Blood to Beg Borrow Or Steal, to First Step Of Love. All those songs have got great grooves to them. That still survives today.”
    • There was no great falling-out when Fraboni was replaced by Johns, as Thrall explains: “No, not at all. It was exciting and the whole thing needed to be invigorated anyway, because Rob and us weren’t quite the perfect match, production-wise. I’ve worked with Rob since ““ I played on a Phoebe Snow album that he produced ““ but his approach wasn’t fitting in with what Glenn and I envisioned Hughes/Thrall to be. So when Andy came in it was a shot in the arm for us ““ and you can certainly hear it on the record.
    • “We did overdubs with Andy on the tracks we did with Rob [which included Coast To Coast and First Step Of Love]. And then of course Andy mixed the whole record. Although I have to say it’s a little bit small and reverb-y for my tastes in this day and age. I’d give anything to be able to remix it, but unfortunately the master tapes were stored at the studio in Los Angeles [United Western Studios]. The ownership of the studio changed hands and any tape in the library that hadn’t been claimed was erased and used for bulk tape. That’s what happened to Hughes/Thrall. It’s horrible. We don’t have the multi-track masters any more. Glenn and I were pretty devastated when we found out.”
  • Executive Producers – Ron Domont
    • Only other credit is the Y&T album Black Tiger
  • Executive Producer- Joel Brandes
    • Two Y&T albums and an album by Jerry Corbetta
  • Assistant Engineers – David Ahlert
    • Worked with Oingo Boingo, Rod Stewart, and Gordon Lightfoot
  • Assistant Engineers – Jim Perkins
    • A few other entries, most notably Save Ferris.
  • Assistant Engineers – Tom Yuill
    • Worked with Ronnie Wood.
  • Mastered by Bob Carbonne at A&M Recording Studios, Hollywood, California, USA
    • Worked with Joe Jackson and UB40.

Album Tracks:

All songs written by Hughes/Thrall except “Coast to Coast” written by Hughes.

Side one:

  1. I Got Your Number
  2. The Look In Your Eye
    1. Track #2 invariably appears as: “Look In Your Eye” in listings, but the Epic release cites: “The Look In Your Eye” on LP.
  3. Beg, Borrow Or Steal
  4. Where Did The Time Go
  5. Muscle And Blood

Side two:

  1. Hold Out Your Life
  2. Who Will you Run To
  3. Coast To Coast (Hughes)
    1. Hughes: “I wanted to give it another stab ““ it’s such a great song. We thought Hughes/Thrall were going to have a lot of success Stateside and I wanted Coast To Coast to get some airplay over there. Most people don’t know it was a Trapeze song; most think of it as a Hughes/Thrall track.”
    2. Thrall: “Glenn had cut a version when he was with Ray Gomez and that’s what I had been listening to. Gomez is a fantastic guitar player; he’s one of my favourites. The solo I take on Coast To Coast is note-for-note what Gomez’s solo was on the demo with Glenn. It’s actually more of a melody than a solo. I thought: “I’m just going to pay homage to Ray on this.’ So I was more familiar with the Gomez version than the original Trapeze one. But then, of course, Glenn and me did our own thing as well ““ all the arpeggiated guitars and the rhythmic colours”¦ all that stuff. But Gomez’s solo was perfect ““ how are you going to beat perfection?”
  4. First Step Of Love

Reception and Review

  • Interestingly all this versatility resulted in a pretty safe, AOR-sounding release.
  • The album received a lot of praise from critics but did not do well with sales.  Hughes blamed this on the fact that both he and Thrall were both battling pretty serious drug addictions during this time and couldn’t do a full tour.  They played in support of Santana with Tommy Aldridge on drums but could only play a few shows. Jesse Harms was on keyboard.  He had previously been part of Sammy Hagar’s backing band.
  • Hughes admits that he and Pat were to blame for the album not really taking off.
    • “If Pat and I had been really on the money I’ve no doubt we’d’ve gone on to huge success with Hughes/Thrall. If we’d’ve been teetotalers ““ as I am now, and have been for many years ““ with no drinking, no drugging, no anything, it would’ve been different.”
  • It’s speculated that having worked with someone with the versatility of Bolin inspired him to search for a similar experience with Thrall.
  • Hughes/Thrall was released on the little-known Boulevard Records, a subsidiary of Epic. 
  • Hughes: “We were one of the first artists to sign for Boulevard ““ we may have been the only artist, in fact. We could have gone with Atlantic, we had three or four offers, but we chose this company.”
  • Thrall elaborates: “The reason we went with them [Boulevard was run by Dennis Lavinthal and Lenny Beer] was that they were two of the biggest independent record promoters in the US at the time. The labels would pay these guys upwards of $100,000 to get radio play. So Epic said: “Since we’re paying this much to you guys to do that, we’ll give you a couple of hundred thousand more and you can go sign some new acts.’
  • Hughes has since described Thrall as “the best guitarist I’ve worked with in my entire career”.
  • “That’s a huge compliment considering all the guys he’s played with ““ that’s wonderful,” Thrall says. “But Glenn and I have a natural chemistry. When we get into a room and start playing, we just click. That’s the bizarre thing. So it’s really easy for us to make music together. You can’t force that to happen, it’s either there or it’s not, and Glenn and I just have that thing.”
  • Hughes agrees: “When we strap on our guitars and stand toe-to-toe in the studio there’s an instant vibe. It’s just there. It’s wonderful. We’re like a force of nature.” A Hurricane/Tornado, if you like”¦
  • “I think our soul is what separates us from a lot of bands. Pat, for instance, is one of the warmest guitarists I’ve ever heard…Right now, we’re looking forward to going out there and destroying audiences”, said Glenn at the time. “Now you’ve really got to be on the ball to make it – you have to be a good musician. We may not be newcomers to rock & roll, but we’re as energetic and hungry as any new band”.
  • Thrall said of this project: “This is the first time I’ve had the chance to totally express myself musically. The music on the album takes a lot of twists and turns because Glenn and I like to weave a variety of textures. The idea was to diversify the music as much as we could without getting esoteric. Most of all, we wanted to keep everything on the edge.”
  • Hughes remarks; “I have lost count of the many people (and musicians!) who have put this LP at the top of their playlist. I am very proud of this project. There is a definite vibe on this gem”. 
  • Claude Schnell joined the live band.  Interview with Claude here: http://www.claudeschnell.com/interview.html
  • Hughes: “Claude was in the band when we started to make demos for the second record. But we never really completed them; we were sort of falling apart. We were also working with Tommy Bolin’s old drummer, Mark Craney. He passed away from diabetes and kidney failure, poor fella. But I like Claude, he’s sort of a Jon Lord type of character.”
  • These days, Glenn Hughes is philosophical about what might have been: “Hughes/Thrall had a short life span. It was extremely short! But I’m glad that we’re embracing the record again now,” he says enthusiastically.
  • Photography by Jim Kennedy captured live at Rissmiller’s (“Country Club“) in Reseda, California on Friday, November 19th, 1982.
  • Link to photos here: https://hughesthrall.com/photos/
  • Glenn Hughes & Pat Thrall (Hughes/Thrall) 1982 Japan TV Interview
  • HUGHES & THRALL – THE LOOK IN YOUR EYES
  • HUGHES & THRALL – I GOT YOUR NUMBER
  • Hughes/Thrall would cross paths a number of times after this album, recording a song for the film “Dragnet” as well as Thrall appearing on Hughes’s solo albums and Hughes using some of the unused songs from their abandoned follow up project.
  • In 2006 a follow up album was announced but it never materialized.  In 2009  Hughes was quoted as saying: “”I have put the Hughes/Thrall 2 project behind me… We started the album in 1997 and Pat Thrall wanted to produce it by himself. Ten years to produce an album? I usually take no more than six months. Let’s move on with our lives.””
  • Tom Hanks & Dan Aykroyd – City Of Crime (Dragnet)

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Episode #75 – Tommy Bolin – Private Eyes

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Lead up to the Album:

  • Immediately after Deep Purple Mark 4 imploded Tommy Bolin formed The Tommy bolin Band.  Deep Purple ceased in mid March of 1976 and by June he was in the studio with his band recording Private Eyes.
  • Tommy had recorded demos of several of the tracks at Glen Holly Studio in Hollywood Hills.
  • Recording Session began at Cherokee Studios on June 8, 1976.
  • Private Eyes Session Dates
    • https://www.tommybolin.com/history/private-eyes/
    • Bobby Berge reports that the recording dates at Cherokee Studios in Hollywood included:
    • June 8: “Shake the Devil” and “Post Toastee”
    • June 9: “You Told Me That You Loved Me” and “Gypsy Soul”
    • June 10: “Hello Again”
    • June 11: “Someday Will Bring Our Love Home” (Carmine Appice filled in on drums.)
    • June 14: “Gotta Dance,” “Sweet Burgundy” and “Bustin’ Out for Rosie” (Bobby back on drums)
    • June 15: Tommy did a number of overdubs
    • June 16: Tommy did a number of overdub
  • They talk of using a drum booth to record trying to mimic the sound the Beatles got at Abbey Road.  It’s also mentioned that in some cases they plugged the guitar direct into the mixing board instead of micing a cab.

Personnel

  • Bass, Vocals – Reggie McBride
    • http://reggiemcbride.com/
    • Played with Rare Earth, Minnie Ripperton (Lovin’ You), Stevie Wonder, Billy Preston, Van Morrison, Elton John, Ry Cooder
  • Drums, Percussion – Bobby Berge
  • Drums – Carmine Appice
    • Interview talking about Tommy
      • How do you remember late Tommy Bolin?
      • Tommy opened up for CACTUS in one of his bands. I always thought he was a great guitarist. I helped him get into DEEP PURPLE and we were always friends. He loved drinking and taking drugs – too bad he was great!!!
      • What do you mean by “I helped him get into DEEP PURPLE”?
      • I knew Tommy and I knew he was a great player. The guys in DEEP PURPLE asked me about him, what I thought of Tommy. I told them he was a great player and a nice guy – next thing I know he was in PURPLE…
      • Did Ritchie Blackmore ever asked you to play with him?
      • Yes, he asked me to join RAINBOW as the original drummer. I couldn’t do it, at the time I had a group with Mike Bloomfield called KGB and I was signed to MCA Records and they wouldn’t let me out of my contract. So, I couldn’t do it. So he then asked Cozy. I used to have a joke with Cozy about him being my professional replacement – first with Jeff Beck and then with Ritchie Blackmore.
  • Guitar, Lead Vocals – Tommy Bolin
  • Keyboards, Vocals – Mark Stein
  • Percussion – Bobbye Hall
  • Piano – Tommy Bolin on “Hello Again”
  • Producer – Dennis Mackay and Tommy Bolin
  • Saxophone, Percussion, Vocals – Norma Jean Bell
    • Played with Dave Mason, The P-Funk All Stars, Frank Zappa.
    • In the 90s she started a Detroit-based record label.
  • Wikipedia credits Del Newman for string arrangements.
  • Wikipedia says it is engineered By Thomas La Tonore and Stephen W Tayler.
    • Stephen W Tayler worked with Peter Gabriel, Kate Bush, Rupert Hine, Rush, Bob Geldof, and Tina Turner.
    • Stephen says that this was one of the first albums he mixed and that those first few albums weren’t recorded by him.
    • Stephen W Tayler Experiential evocation by Anil Prasad
      • Private Eyes was my first proper job as a full engineer at Trident. I wasn’t involved with the recording. That was done in the States. At this time, Tommy had been playing with the touring line-up of Deep Purple, and I remember the atmosphere and entourage were quite rock and roll, with lots of partying and outrageous behaviour. 
      • But we had a wonderful time when it was just us in the mix room. There was great music and sounds blaring out of the massive studio monitors, along with very silly humor. We all wore hats. Sometimes all of us were wearing berets. We took several photos of the four of us swapping seats, but with the hats staying in the same position. We spent much of the time in hysterics, but the work did get done.
      • It was an incredible experience for me to be a part of this amazing-sounding record. Fond memories. On the last night of working on the album after Tommy had gone back to his hotel, Dennis said “I don’t think we will see Tommy again,” which felt very strange at the time. A couple of months after that we heard the tragic news that Tommy had died from an accidental overdose while on tour.

Album Art & Booklet Review

Bolin 2

Album Tracks:

Bolin 3

Side one:

  1. Bustin’ Out For Rosey (Bolin)
  2. Sweet Burgundy (Cook, Bolin)
  3. Post Toastee (Bolin)
Bolin 4

Side two:

  1. Shake the Devil (Cook, Bolin)
  2. Gypsy Soul (Cook, Bolin)
  3. Someday Will Bring Our Love Home (Tesar, Bolin)
    1. Drums by Carmine Appice?
  4. Hello, Again (Cook, Bolin)
    1. Bolin plays piano on this track
  5. You Told Me That You Loved Me (Bolin)

Reception and Review

  • As soon as the recording was complete the band was back on the road opening the tour in Albuquerque, New Mexico on July 16.
  • On the tour they played material from Teaser and Private Eyes.
  • There was a break in the tour and on August 29 they continued with Johnnie Bolin on drums and Jimmy Haslip on bass after Berge and McBride left the band.
  • The album was released in September of 1976.

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Episode #74 – The Rod Evans Singles

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Lead up to the Recording:

  • July of 1969 to 1972, Rod did very little musically.
  • During this time he seems to have attended medical school in America.
  • Some sources such as Discogs say this single was released in October of 1970.
  • Jerry Bloom says it was released in October of 1971 (via Rod Evans Facebook Page in 2014).

Note from Maria, Rod’s ex-girlfriend:

Album Art & Booklet Review

  • Original official release.
  • Bootleg versions. “The Booby Bootlegs”

Album Tracks:

Side one:

  1. Hard To Be Without You (George Fischoff & Tony Powers)
    1. Rod Evans – 1970 – Hard To Be Without You
    2. George Fischoff
      1. A Julliard graduate. Youngest composer on Broadway in 1970.
      2. Tons of credits on Discogs including “98.6” by Barry St. John (and versions by others). “We Were Made For Each Other” by The Monkees.
      3. Wrote the song “Lazy Day” by Spanky and Our Gang.
    3. Tony Powers
      1. https://tonypowersmusic.com/home.html
      2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Powers
      3. Co-wrote the song “98.6 with George Fischoff.  Wrote the song “Odyssey” which was covered by KISS.

Side two:

  1. You Can’t Love a Child Like a Woman (Barry Gordon)
    1. Rod Evans – 1970 – You Can’t Love A Child Like A Woman
    2. Barry Gordon
      1. https://www.discogs.com/artist/1079471-Barry-Gordon
      2. At the age of 6 he recorded “Nuttin’ for Christmas”

Producer – Bobby Paris

  • Blue-Eyed soul singer from The Golden Keys
  • Produced some singles for Capitol Records through until the early 80s.

Bootleg Release:

According to DPAC.at bootleg was released in November of 1970.

For Further Information:

Listener Mail/Comments

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Episode #73 – David Coverdale’s Whitesnake – Snakebite

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Thanks to our Brothers at the Deep Dive Podcast Network:

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Show Updates:

Lead up to the Album:

  • The newly formed Whitesnake was supposed to play their first gig at The Sky Bird Club in Nottingham on February 23, 1978.  Neil Murray confirms in Martin Popoff’s book “Sail Away” that this never happened.
  • 5-6 April 1978 London rehearsals
  • Recorded April 7th – 13th 1978 Central Recorders to record Snakebite EP
  • Bernie Marsden explains that “the record company wouldn’t commit to an album.”
  • They apparently had a friend — Robbie Dennis — at EMI who was a bit fan of the band but his boss wouldn’t let him sign them.  Bernie Marsden credits Dennis in having a huge part of the Whitesnake story.
  • Released June 2, 1978 in the UK.

Personnel

Album Art & Booklet Review

  • Marsden said the covers changed all over the world.  He claims they didn’t even see the covers until Lovehunter.

Technical:

Album Tracks:

Side one:

  1. Bloody Mary
    • Written by Coverdale
  2. Steal Away

Side two:

  1. Ain’t No Love in the Heart of the City
    • Written by Michael Price and Dan Walsh in 1974
    • First recorded by Bobby “Blue” Bland
    • Ain’t No Love In The Heart Of The City
    • Martin Popoff says they used this song as an audition piece for the “revolving door of players they were trying to bring into the band.”
    • Marsden says that to this day people still think Whitesnake wrote this song.
  2. Come On
    • Written by Coverdale, Marsden
    • This one would become a live staple.  This was the first song Marsden and Coverdale wrote together in a flat in London.

Reception and Review

  • Marsden says there was a fifth song for this EP called “The First Time” but it was lost and has never resurfaced.
  • Murray says there wasn’t much difference between the EP and the album Trouble because they went into the studio to do the full album just a few months later.
  • For North America this was combined with four tracks from Northwinds and sold as an LP.
  • The first 15,000 copies were pressed on white vinyl.  The second edition was pressed as black vinyl but a much smaller number.
  • Murray says this was the turning point where it shifted from Coverdale solo to the band Whitesnake.
  • On May 1, 1978 the band filmed a promo video for Snakebite at Shepperton Studios.
  • Bloody Mary was on TOTP on that day
  • 20th June 1978 London, UK: Recording backing for Bloody Mary for Top Of The Pops. 21st June 1978 London, UK: Filming for Top Of The Pops. Aired 22nd June.
  • Snakebite video:
    • 0:00 Come On
    • 3:30 – Aint’ No Love in the Heart of the City
    • 8:05 – Bloody Mary
    • 11:07 – Steal Away (fade out)
  • The Snakebite video was shown in the UK as support feature to the Bilitis soft porn movie by David Hamilton and premiered on June 22. David got some offers to appear in movies afterwards
  • Pictures from the premier.
  • Whitesnake – Bloody Mary (Top Of The Pops 1978)

For Further Information:

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Episode #72 – The Deep Purple Game Show

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Show Updates:

  • Comments from social media.

A Word from Our Sponsor:

  • Joe Lynn Turner & Zantac

The Deep Purple Game Show:

The Contestants:

The Subjects:

  • What is the funniest Deep Purple Song?
  • Drink, Dinner, Jam
  • Favorite Deep Purple Album Cover
  • Duel Pepper (Deep Purple Anagram Game)
  • Least Favorite Deep Purple Album Cover
  • Fly on the Wall
  • What is a better name than “The Deep Purple Game Show”
  • Deep Purple as . . . The Simpsons
  • Would you rather . . .
    • Have the Deep Purple Catalog from 1968 to 1973
    • Or the Deep Purple catalog from 1974 through 1990

Listener Mail/Comments

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Episode #71 – Billy Cobham – Spectrum (with The Simple Man)

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Personnel

Album Art & Booklet Review

  • Design [Album Design] – Stanislaw Zagorski
    • Polish graphic artist who worked on a number of album covers, mostly for jazz bands starting in the 60s.
  • Painting [Cover] – Jeff Snider (2)
    • Canadian musician and artist, only a few other entires on Discogs.
  • Photography By [Backliner Photo] – Armen Kachaturian
    • Did work for some other artists throughout the 70s, including Billy Cobham’s “Crosswinds” album.
  • Photography By [Inside Liner Photo] – Urve Kuusik
    • Did work for Charles Mingus, Miles Davis, Chicago, Earth Wind & Fire

Technical:

  • Engineer [Recording & Re-mix] – Ken Scott
    • Engineered for The Beatles, Elton John, Pink Floyd

Notes:

All selection written by William E Cobham Jr.

The personnel on all selections except Spectrum & Le Lis is Billy Coham,, percussion; Tommy Bolinm guitar; Jan Hammer, Electric piano, acoustic piano & Moog synthesizer; Leland Sklar, fender bass. There is no acoustic piano on Red Baron.

Moog synthesizer drum, Moog sample and hold devices were used on drum solos on Straus and Snoopy’s Search.

The personnel on Spectrum & Les Lis is Billy Cobham, percussion; Joe Farrell, flute & soprano sax on Spetrucm and alto on Le Lis; Jimmy POwens, fugelhorn on Spetctrum and flugelhorn & trumpet on Le Lis; John Tropea, guitar on Le Lis; Jan Hamer, electric piano & Moog synthesizer; Ron Carter, acoustic bass; Ray Barrelo, congas.

What is life but a spectrum and what is music but life itself. Billy Cobham, Jr.

Album Tracks:

Side one:

  1. Quadrant 4
  2. a) Searching For The Right Door b) Spectrum
  3. a) Anxiety b) Taurian Matador

Side two:

  1. Stratus
  2. a) To the Women in My Life b) Le Lis
  3. a) Snoopy’s Search b) Red Baron

Listener Mail/Comments

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Episode #70 – Your Deep Purple Collections

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Thanks to our Brothers at the Deep Dive Podcast Network:

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Listener Submissions:

  • Gary Harvey on Twitter
    • Perfect Strangers jacket that Ian Paice gave me back in 1993, went to a family birthday party and he sent me back home with this!
  • Shaun Macguire on Twitter
    • The best musical experience of my life was sitting 10metres from Ian doing a drum workshop,he played the intro to fireball and the room shook,it was so surreal,I got to meet him after and you wouldn’t meet a nicer bloke,so humble and gracious,this is the poster he signed
  • Jose lamadrid on Twitter
    • Link to Facebook story (in Spanish)
      • Sí, los has contado bien, 26, veintiseis discos como veintiseis soles. Sí, todos de Deep Purple y sí, todos en directo.
      • Efectivamente hay uno repetido, el Made in Japan, pero no cuenta como repe, la edición de la carátula negra no sólo es remasterizada sino que tiene otro disco adicional.
      • Posiblemente el Made in Europe (que todavía anda por casa en formato vinilo) sea también un recopliatorio de los conciertos que dieron los Purple en Europa, obviamente, entre el 74 y el 75… sí, ya estaba Coverdale, claro. Si te conoces bien la historia púrpura sabrás como yo que a Gillan lo echaron en el 73. Luego volvió, pero bueno, el Made in Europe lo grabó Coverdale …¿cómo dices? ¿que también cantaba Glenn Hughes? Listo, que eres un listo, pues no sigas leyendo, Glenn quería echar a Coverdale y quedarse con el puesto de único cantante, y además convertir a Deep Purple en un grupo funky. Y claro, Blackmore se fue. El bueno de Ritchie jamás habría grabado Come taste the band.
      • Enterramos el hacha de guerra, venga. Bueno, pues sí 26 dicos en directo de la banda que inventó el Heavy Metal (aquí debería comenzar otra discusión, pero la dejamos para otro día). Te iba a decir que no soy particularmente un friki de este grupo, pero creo que más que posiblemente te estaría mintiendo. Pero sí que hay algo de cierto en que no soy un "picao" de Purple. O sea, me encantan, pero lo que más me gusta de estos británicos son sus discos en directo, ahí sí que entramos en el terreno del fanatismo. Concretamente los de la época de Blackmore. Ojo, sin desmerecer a Steve Morse, que es un tocado de la mano de Dios. Pero es que el hijoputa de Ritchie, el cabrón no tocaba igual dos temas, quiero decir, que los interpretaba de una forma completemente distinta. Y no me refiero sólo al solo…je je je, si eres lector de mis pajas mentales rockeras, habrás leído esta expresión más de una vez, me mola, la voy a patentar «sólo el solo». Bueno, que me lío, Ritchie es ese tipo de guitarrista de los años setenta que le gustaba alargar el tema, llevarlo a terrenos insondados, improvisar, y al fin y al cabo darle el follón a la banda que le acompañaba, ya fueran los Purple o sus Rainbow, para ver si podían seguirle, y vaya si le seguían, como que les iba el puesto en ello. 
      • Si me conoces bien, sabrás que soy más de Rainbow que de los Deep Purple, y de hecho tengo también como seis discos de Rainbow en directo (todos de la misma gira del 76) donde nuevamente Ritchie hace gala de su genio musical, que va de la mano de su mal genio personal, dotando a cada canción de un toquecito personal que la hacía distinta de la que había interpretado en día anterior en otra ciudad. Y esa manía de no tocar dos veces igual un mismo tema ya comenzó en la época de los Púrpura Profunda.
      • Pero eso es fabuloso, al menos para mí, puedes escuchar un tema, pongamos el Mistreated, en varios de sus discos de las giras europeas (sí, con Coverdale, y gracias a Dios sin Hughes) y descubrir un pequeño matiz en cada una de las versiones. Igual para tí es un aburrimiento, pero a mi me encanta.
      • El bueno de David Coverdale también hizo algo parecido con sus Whitesnake, y te remito a un post antiguo mío donde disertaba sobre las glorias de la primera formación de la Serpiente Albina (Serpens Albus, Papá) frente a la miseria comercial del WS del 87. Whitesnake, como decía, tiene precisamente dos versiones radicalmente opuestas del Mistreated que cada una vale su peso en oro. Y no quiero decir que una sea más fiel a la original y la otra la toque con ritmo de reagge, sino que la parte instrumental de ambas versiones no tiene que ver una con la otra melódicamente hablando, ni en duración ni en quien ni como toca un solo o quien hace la intro. Concretamente, si te pica el gusanito porque eres un forofo de este Mistreated, te recomiendo que lo busques en youtube, creo que no existe en disco, creo, aunque lo investigaré. Además en la guitarra no estaba mi idolatrado Bernie Marsden, sino Mel Galley. Vale te doy más datos, la que cantaron en Donnington en el 83, ya con Cozy Powell a la batería. Bueno, pues esa versión la comparas con la que tocan en el Live in the heart of the city. ¿Algo que ver? Nada ¿verdad? Maravilloso quillo. Músicos ingleses ¿qué más podemos añadir?
      • Pero claro, todo éso lo comenzó Ritchie Blackmore, claramente en la onda de los músicos que había en los setenta, bendita década. Y yo te animo a oír pausadamente esos temas, a desgranar esos directos y descubrir los matices de cada canción, sabes, ese "lick" que mete Ritchie en tal tema, o esa intro distinta que hace para este otro, y de esa forma puedes decidir cual es tu versión favorita.
      • Dejo para el siguiente «post», otra disertación acerca de Purple con Blackmore y Purple con Morse. No, no se trata de decir qué banda es mejor, ni de pelearnos, tú sabes que yo no sería imparcial, considero a Ritchie como el mejor guitarrista de rock de todos los tiempos y soy sinceramente un apasionado de su forma de tocar y componer…ojo Y componer, que igual estás hasta los cataplines del riff de Smoke on the water, pero seguro que ni tú ni muchos otros "mejores guitarristas" habéis sido capaces de componerlo. No, no van por ahí los tiros, sino del tema Pictures of home, pero eso tengo que estudiarlo tranquilamente y ver los repertorios de los veintiseis discos…veintiseis discos en directo, ahí es nada. Un abrazo
    • English Translation (through Google):
      • Yes, you counted them well, 26, twenty-six discs like twenty-six soles. Yes, all of Deep Purple and yes, all live.
      • Indeed there is one repeated, the Made in Japan, but it does not count as repe, the edition of the black cover is not only remastered but it has another additional album.
      • Possibly the Made in Europe (which is still at home in vinyl format) is also a compilation of the concerts given by the Purple in Europe, obviously, between 74 and 75 … yes, Coverdale was there, of course. If you know the purple story well you will know like me that Gillan was thrown out in ’73. Then he came back, but hey, the Made in Europe was recorded by Coverdale … how do you say? What was Glenn Hughes singing too? Done, you’re smart, don’t read on, Glenn wanted to kick Coverdale out and keep the position of sole singer, and also turn Deep Purple into a funky band. And of course, Blackmore left. The good guy Ritchie would never have recorded Come taste the band.
      • We buried the hatchet, come on. Well, yes, there are 26 live bands from the band that invented Heavy Metal (another discussion should start here, but we leave it for another day). I was going to tell you that I’m not particularly a geek in this group, but I think more than possibly I would be lying to you. But there is some truth in that I am not a “picao” from Purple. In other words, I love them, but what I like most about these British people is their live records, there we do enter the field of fanaticism. Specifically those from the Blackmore era. Be careful, without detracting from Steve Morse, who is a headdress from the hand of God. But the thing is that Ritchie’s motherfucker, the bastard didn’t play two songs the same way, I mean, he interpreted them in a completely different way. And I’m not just talking about the solo … hehe heh, if you are a reader of my mental rock straws, you will have read this expression more than once, I am cool, I will patent it “only the solo”. Well, what a mess, Ritchie is that type of guitarist from the seventies who liked to lengthen the song, take it to unfathomable terrain, improvise, and at the end of the day give the band that accompanied him, whether it be the Purple or his Rainbows, to see if they could follow him, and boy, did they follow him, like they were in charge of it.
      • If you know me well, you will know that I am more of Rainbow than of Deep Purple, and in fact I also have about six live Rainbow records (all from the same tour of ’76) where Ritchie once again shows off his musical genius, which is by the hand of his personal bad temper, giving each song a personal touch that made it different from the one he had performed the previous day in another city. And that mania of not playing the same theme twice has already started in the Deep Purple era.
      • But that’s fabulous, at least for me, you can listen to a theme, let’s put the Mistreated, on several of his European tour records (yes, with Coverdale, and thank God without Hughes) and discover a little nuance in each of the versions. Same for you is a bore, but I love it.
      • The good of David Coverdale also did something similar with his Whitesnake, and I refer you to an old post of mine where he lectured on the glories of the first formation of the Albino Serpent (Serpens Albus, Dad) against the commercial misery of the ’87 WS. Whitesnake, as I was saying, has precisely two radically opposite versions of the Mistreated that each is worth its weight in gold. And I do not mean that one is more faithful to the original and the other is played with a rhythm of reagge, but rather that the instrumental part of both versions does not have to do with each other melodically speaking, neither in duration nor in who or how it plays a solo or who does the intro. Specifically, if you get bitten by the worm because you are a fan of this Mistreated, I recommend that you look for it on YouTube, I think it does not exist on disk, I think, although I will investigate it. Also on guitar was not my idol Bernie Marsden, but Mel Galley. Ok I give you more information, the one they sang in Donnington in 83, already with Cozy Powell on drums. Well, you compare that version with the one they play at Live in the heart of the city. Something to see? Nothing right? Wonderful keel. English musicians what more can we add?
      • But of course, all that started Ritchie Blackmore, clearly in the vein of the musicians that were in the seventies, blessed decade. And I encourage you to listen slowly to those songs, to reel in those live shows and discover the nuances of each song, you know, that “lick” What does Ritchie put in such a theme, or that different intro that he does for this other one, and that way you can decide which is your favorite version.
      • I leave for the next «post», another dissertation about Purple with Blackmore and Purple with Morse. No, it is not about saying which band is better, or fighting, you know that I would not be impartial, I consider Ritchie as the best rock guitarist of all time and I am sincerely passionate about his way of playing and composing. ..eye And compose, that you are still up to the riff catapults of Smoke on the water, but surely neither you nor many other “better guitarists” you have been able to compose it. No, the shots do not go there, but rather the Pictures of home theme, but I have to study it calmly and see the repertoires of the twenty-six albums … twenty-six albums live, there is nothing. A hug
    • Marcelo Soares on Twitter:
      • 1. Poster from Ian Gillan’s gig in Porto Alegre (Brazil), may of 1992
        • 1. Gillan poster pic (attached) – this is from 1992, the first time when he sang in my original city, Porto Alegre. Deep Purple had visited for the first time in the year before (I have that poster also). 
        • But this one is much more special, as the cats can attest. It was pasted to a wall on the street I used to walk to go to school and back. I was 15 and studied at night. It rained a lot in Porto Alegre in April, so the water eased the glue. At 11pm, no one bothered a hairy kid who wanted to take a street poster home. The only problem is we had no money for me to attend the gig. So, I got there early, to listen to the soundcheck. Araújo Vianna was open on the top back then, and everyone could listen to everything. 
        • Ian arrived in a burgundy-coloured Volkswagen Santana, after giving an interview to the local radio. I was the first one in the queue to greet him. When the door opened and that towering man left the car, it took as long as it took for the Joker to draw his gun in the 1989 Batman movie (that was my exact reference at that moment). Speechless, I shook his hand and said: “mr. Gillan, you’re the best”. He answered: “I know”. I stayed there for the gig, but could not enter. Other tens of people had the same idea. When Black Night began, I was near the door and people went crazy. Police stormed in to spoil the fun – but it made it even more exciting, because I never thought I could be considered a public risk. At 15, that’s exactly what you need. Then I went to the front of the venue, where there was a green mound. 
        • People who had no money for the ticket gathered there to have a drink and listen to the music. I didn’t really drink, but I met a female colleague who was from the volleyball team in my school, a stunning girl. And she asked me if I wanted a sip of caipirinha. Of course I did. Then three inconsequent guys went in to kick the brick wall at the right side of the door. They took rounds kicking it. And they tore it open. Girls screaming: it was the ladies’ room. One got in. Two got in. The third one was clobbered by the police before he could enter. A policeman stood there guarding the hole on the wall every day for the next week or so, before they fixed it. Anyway, I was sipping caipirinha with the gorgeous volley girl who I would hardly ever talk to otherwise, and my favorite singer was just there, singing, and I was singing along, and… all that caipirinha made me tipsy. So, after the gig ended, I stayed there for some time talking to my friends and watching the consequences of the wall attack, and I may have laid my head on the colleague’s breasts, but all I know is she never talked to me again. 
        • I have a bootleg of that concert, and it’s even nicer than I remember.
        • (I told Gillan that story some two decades after it happened. He laughed a lot and told me the story from the Greek concert where there were people climbing the ceiling and the police stormed in – one of those famous “oy, oy” moments.)
      • 2. Poster from Deep Purple’s first Brazilian tour (1991)
        • 3. DVD with botched recording moments in an interview I did with Jon Lord for MTV Brazil in 2009. He also signed my list of questions.
          • Marcelo Soares interviews Jon Lord for MTV Brasil, May of 2009
          • At 13:57, my attempts at recording my opening and closing remarks for the interview. The great part of it is we can listen to some of the rehearsal. That was the first time when Jon played Soldier of Fortune in his Concerto tour. At 17:02 I begin singing along before recording my remarks. Jon let me stay to watch the rehearsal, and I ended up going to a rock store gallery nearby with Steve Balsamo and Kasia Laska to buy baby clothes with a Deep Purple logo for Jon’s recently born grandson.  
          • Check Jon’s face at 24:20 – 24:55.
          • Plus, he autographed my question list:
        • 4. Napkin from the pub where Deep Purple drank themselves under the table before recording Black Night. I wrote the lyrics to the song in it after the third pint, ten years ago.
          • 2. Napkin with “Black Night” lyrics on it. In 2010, I was a politics reporter at MTV Brazil and went to Brussels for a World Bank event on corruption. On my way back, I stopped in London for a couple of days and I decided to make a special feature for the 40 years of Black Night. MTV Brazil had that usual clip, so I could tell the story as it happened. I went to Holborn by tube and looked at where De Lane Lea studios (then Kingsway Studios) was located. It was now a drugstore. Then I stopped by a cafe to check on a Deep Purple biography what it said about where exactly was the bar where they got pissed off. Found out it was the Newton Arms, just around the block. So I went there with a camera. 
          • It was about 3PM, so I could have a drink. After the first pint, I talked to the oldest waiter there and asked him if he was present that night. It was a long shot, of course. And he wasn’t there in 1970 anyway, but he worked there in the early 80s when Gillan owned the studio. So I turned the camera on and he regaled me with tales about how musicians drank there and how they went back to the studio at Kingsway. The pub is in fact located on the antipod of the block in relation to the drugstore front, but he assured me there was an entrance on Newton St, through the parking lot. Then he poured light and bitter beer just like he said Gillan liked. “That man is a solid beer drinker”, he said. 
          • Then I asked for another light and bitter pint and looked for the biggest table, where five would fit, and sat there with the beer, listening to Black Night on my phones and trying to see myself among them that night. 
          • When I found a napkin. And I turned the camera on while I wrote the lyrics to Black Night on it, at a table that seemed big enough to sit my five favorite musicians. I could imagine how great the special report on Black Night at 40 would be. 
          • Of course, only when I was back at the TV station I found out the videotape was not rolling. Never drink at work, kids. 
          • Bonus track – my interview with Jon Lord for MTV Brazil in May of 2009, with all the errors. 
      • Mhenry on Twitter:
        • This is my copy of Machine Head. Purchased in Geneva in 1973. Our high school band went to Switzerland that summer. 
        • Waited all year to buy it until I was in Switzerland. Didn’t stop in Montreaux so bought it in Geneva.
        • Best souvenir of all time!
      • Peder on Instagram:
        • Ritchie autographed leather jacket from 1996.
        • It was before the show. I watched him play football  pre-show.  After the game he exited the pitch on the opposite side and I walked towards him. I asked him if I could have his autograph and he said no problems.  He told me he couldn’t stop and chat because he wanted to avoid the crowd that was walking towards him. So me and my mate was the only two getting thigns signed that day. Short meeting but he was kind and friends.
      • Scott Haskin via email:
        • I may have shared these pics (well, not THESE pics, I just took them and 2 of are a pic but the same one) but I saw your post so I thought I would send them over.  All from the night in Denver on 8-26-1998 when I sat next to Steve’s cousins at the show and almost met him but did meet Roger where fate either did or did not take place inthe form of Fools.  Good times!
        • Oh!  I didn’t even think about these from NAMM this year.
        • My Masterclass with Steve is on 7-17.  Can’t wait!
      • Steve Hunt on Facebook:
        • This I actually paid for.Saw it on the wall of a ticket brokerage and snagged it.Cant remember what I paid,but I’m guessing $250.
        • An autographed show schedule from Rainbow at The Galaxy Theater in Santa Ana CA 1997.This was handed to me by Doogie White as the band were returning for the encores.I was right up front by Blackmore for this show.In fact,Ritchie kept handing me beers all night.Signatures are RB top left,DW top right,Paul Morris center,Greg Smith bottom left,Candice Night bottom right.Only the drummer,Jon Micelli didn’t sign it.
      • Adrian Hernandez on Facebook:
        • Hey guys! Here is my ticket for when I went to go see Ian Gillan’s solo tour for his Gillan’s Inn tour back in 2006. He was in town in Phoenix (Scottsdale to be exact) and it was a small venue in which I was up front. Ian was nice enough to stick around after the show and shake hands. He shook my hand and even autographed my ticket. Here it is in a frame. It was an awesome experience!!
      • Steve Hunt on Facebook:
        • Got these signed by JLT after a solo show around 2006 or so.
        • Graham Bonnet signed this after an Alcatrazz gig in 2012.
      • Stewart smith on Twitter:
        • Autograph in Deep Purple Book.
        • I have Glenn’s signature in the same book, signed at Bradford Rio’s on his first gigs with half of Europe as his band.Gillan signature was from Nottingham. I have a photo with him. Jon Ian and Roger signed the book in Newcastle after a City Hall gig.  I think Jon’s final tour.
    • Unsermanninflorida on Instagram:
    • Jim Massa on Twitter, YouTube, and Email
      • Nate and John,
      • It’s 1982 or so, I remember hearing the news that the Mark 2 lineup was reforming, that an album was in the works. I was super excited as I saw them twice back in the 70s (mark2, also saw mark 3 and mark 4). At the time I was living in NH, but not able to steal away to Stowe, VT in hopes of seeing them…
      • Anyway, Perfect Strangers was released, and I was really happy, thought it was an excellent album (still my favorite of the reformation years). Then I heard of the upcoming tour. Got tickets to see them at the Worcester Centrum in MA (I mention this as you guys are from RI and would know where this is). On the drive down, I was wondering what song would they open the show with? I figured it would be Highway Star. And they did! It was a blistering kick ass version. I knew it was going to be a super concert.
      • Next they played SKOW and when they did the bit from JCS, my thought was, these boys are on fire. They then did several songs from PS, Nobody’s Home, Under the Gun – Ritchie smoking the frets, giving a clinic on how to really shred. They played PS, CIT, Beethoven with Jon taking his solo spot where he played snippets of Burntwood and Rhapsody in Blue which I can attest to as a technically demanding piece to play. Next was Knocking at your back door, then Gypsy’s Kiss. Loved watching Jon and Ritchie playing off of each other. Lazy, Space Truckin followed to close out the show. Speed King and SOTW were the encores. It was great watching Jon and Ritchie duel it out during Speed King. Great  fabulous concert! The photo of the concert program comes from this concert. (It is in the size of an album) They played 5 songs off PS – good mix of new and old material.
      • Lights go up. I stayed in my seat absorbing what I just saw and heard, namely the best band ever. I finally left the centrum. I am walking to my vehicle when I see a purple limo with dark windows leave – obviously, the lads being driven back to the hotel or something. I waved and gave 2 thumbs up)) This was in 1985.
      • 1987 – HOBL tour. I already had tickets to see them at the Worcester centrum again when someone from where I was working at the time (plumbing wholesale warehouse) said he had ticket for Purple at the Cumberland County Civic Center in Portland ME. He gave ticket to me. At CCCC, opened with Highway Star again, followed by SKOW. Then a bunch of songs from the new album including Bad Attitude, Unwritten Law which then morphed into solo by Paicey, Black Night, CIT, PS, Beethoven with Jon’s solo all followed. Knocking was next, Mitzi Dupree, Hard Loving Woman. Next was Dead Or Alive which saw amazing dueling between Jon and Ritchie, closed out with Space Truckin. SOTW was the encore except Roger was standing on the stage where Ritchie usually is because He had Ritchie’s strat and was playing SOTW! Ritchie had Roger’s bass and was standing next to Jon (Roger was playing a stick bass on this tour). So, that was an interesting twist. I distinctly remember Ritchie going right to the front of the stage during his solo on Highway Star and really letting it rip. Those in the front rows got a treat. My seat was up a bit to the left of the stage. I was looking right down at Jon. I had a great view of watching the maestro play all night)) The photos of the program comes from that night.
      • The set at the Centrum was the same except that Lazy was dropped in and Mitzi Dupree not played. Ritchie played SOTW. This was the last concert I have ever seen as within 2 weeks, I was traveling across the continent to Alaska to start graduate school. Been here ever since. 
      • Anyway, those are my recollections of several wonderful nights in my life. (I already told you guys about meeting Ritchie, him giving me backstage pass during the Rising tour and meeting the lads in Rainbow – the other great night of my life).
      • Cheers))
    • Janne Puska on Twitter:
      • Battle Rages On tour shirt from Helsinki 93
    • Frank Theilgaard-Mortensen
      • Signed copy of “Play Me Out” by Glenn Hughes
      • Joe Lynn Turner – Oh and this one! Dont know why I took a red pen to the concert
      • Joe was standing in the corner backstage and looking kinda mad. I went over to him and his first response was “wow someone who knows me… All the other ones are talking to Glenn” 😂 it was a Hughes Turner Project concert.
    • Arthur Smith on Twitter
      • I’ve kept this for years for no known reason, also have a couple of fanzines from that era if of interest. Additionally I’ve many programmes and tickets if that’s the sort of thing you’re interested in.
      • I’ve kept this for years for no known reason, also have a couple of fanzines from that era if of interest. Additionally I’ve many programmes and tickets if that’s the sort of thing you’re interested in.
    • ARthur Smith via email:
      • Hi,
      • Thought I’d stop cluttering up twitter and send via email. The Knebworth festival programme was just the world tour programme which was a missed opportunity to have something with all the bands in it. I’ve tweeted my ticket before.
      • The Battle Rages On arrived in Birmingham in Nov 93, I can’t recall whether I knew Ritchie was leaving but the onstage stuff is all captured on the video that came out. The programme is cobbled together of pictures from Perfect Strangers era. I was high above the stage on Ritchie’s side so could see backstage. Candice was around and all sorts of weird things were going on that I can’t recall in detail, he would wander off stage when bored. Not a great gig but memorable for other reasons.
      • I went to the second night announced of the Concerto which was I think the day before the one that was filmed. Only time I ever saw Dio sing live to be honest, huge voice obviously.
      • The last time I saw Purple was at Ipswich, I see the ticket is for March 2002 but it was deferred to September by which time Don was in the band but Jon was fulfilling his contract and played half the gig, very emotional as it turned out to be his last gig with the band and, indeed, I’ve not been to see them since either.
      • Also all my Rainbow tickets, bit of a gap between 1983 and 2016…
      • Hope of interest, I’m more of a Whitesnake and Rainbow fan these days. Whitesnake are still astonishing live and I’ve an unused ticket from May this year, it may never happen in that scale again ☹️.
      • Cheers
      • Arthur
    • Mike Healy via email:
      • Here’s a funny one. Way back in 4th grade for me, in the fall of 1985, I won a Deep Purple prize at some sort of game booth. I can’t remember what the game was, but I won, and was told to pick a prize. I remember that the walls of the booth were covered with these little cardboard frames that held small, glassy replicas of popular albums of the day. The only one that really stood out for me was the one for “Perfect Strangers”, so I chose that one, and held onto it. And it’s still on one of the walls of my house, all these years later.
      • The small glass replica is about 5.5″ square, with the album cover graphics printed on the underside.
      • A couple of years ago, I took it down to dust off the frame, and clean off the glass on the inside. As I slid the glass cover out into my hand, something funny hit me: I thought, “Jeez, If I didn’t know any better, I would swear that this is something you’d see at a party, where people are passing it around, with a few lines of coke on it!”.
      • Then I thought, “Wait…wait a damn minute…is this what that was all along, and I had no idea???”
      • There were things like that which were popular back in the late ’70s. I remember seeing a picture of a promotional gimmick that Polydor made for a Pat Travers album which was a “coke mirror” that looked like a dollar bill with his image in the middle, and some little trough-lines cut into the glass for easy dispensation.
      • Wow, times were different then, weren’t they!
      • Regardless of it being a suspected piece of drug-intended paraphernalia, I still look at it fondly on the wall.
    • Rich Shailor via Facebook:
      • My favorite picture…….. right after my daughter was born I was backstage doing the proud dad thing and showed him a picture of the newly minted Shailor. He looked at me and said “what do you want me to do, kiss the baby?” So I doubled down and said “yes, as a matter of fact I do!” So he did Thirteen years later she returned the favor at her first Deep Purple show
    • Peter Gardow via email:
      • Nate, this is kind of lame, but the best memorabilia I have.  Back on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 Heaven & Hell were playing the Mohegan Sun Arena.  Those of us that were going had all seen Sabbath at the Bushnell in Hartford on the Dehumanizer tour in 1992, two of the guys saw Sabbath & BOC on the Black & Blue tour in 1981.  Between the Dehumanizer tour and 2007, me and my buddy Jim saw Dio at the Webster Theater in Hartford after an afternoon gig at the amphitheater in Hartford of Pat Travers, Fog Hat, BOC & Steppenwolf –  one of the best rock and roll days ever.  So as I was awaiting the boys to show up at my house, I pulled out my Holy Diver LP and cranked it up, only to find out that I had stored it wrong and the LP was totally warped and unplayable.  I was so bummed and not happy with myself – so I warmed up the oven, and made a chip bowl out of my ruined LP.  A few years later I got another LP chip bowl from one of my sisters – Dionne Warwick – any DP connections with her?   By the way, H&H was totally awesome that evening. 

    Listener Mail/Comments

    • Comments about the show? Things you’d like us to cover?  We’d love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

    Episode #69 – Whoosh! (Part 2)

    Disclaimer: The video used on YouTube is a byproduct of producing our audio podcast. We post it merely as a convenience to those who prefer the YouTube format. Please subscribe using one of the links below if you’d prefer a superior audio experience.

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      • The “Supernatural” Leaky Mausoleum
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    Thanks to our Brothers at the Deep Dive Podcast Network:

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    Show Updates:

    Lead up to the Album:

    • Covered in part 1!
    • Recap:
      • This is our first listen.
      • Tracks 1 through 6 covered in part 1.
      • Will consider doing a follow up in a few weeks (or months) to revisit after a little time with the album.

    Personnel

    • Covered in part 1!

    Album Art & Booklet Review

    • Title of the album – remember when people were outraged about the title “Whoosh!”  for like 3 days?

    Technical:

    • Covered in part 1!

    Album Tracks:

    • 7 -What the What
    • 8 – The Long Way Round
    • 9 – The Power of the Moon
    • 10 – Remission Possible
    • 11 – Man Alive
    • 12 – And the Address
    • 13 – Dancing in My Sleep

    Listener Mail/Comments

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    Episode #68 – Whoosh! (Part 1)

    Disclaimer: The video used on YouTube is a byproduct of producing our audio podcast. We post it merely as a convenience to those who prefer the YouTube format. Please subscribe using one of the links below if you’d prefer a superior audio experience.

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    Thanks to our Brothers at the Deep Dive Podcast Network:

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    Show Updates:

    Lead up to the Album:

    • Originally intended for June 12 release. Delayed because of COVID-19.
    • Lineup of band – debatable based on how you count.
      • Rich Shailor pointed out this is the most albums by any lineup with five.
      • Mark 2 release five with the Concerto so it’s debatable.
      • Longest lineup to stay together at 18 years and counting!

      Personnel

      • You know the lineup!

      Album Art & Booklet Review

      • Review of the cover.

      Technical:

      • Producer – Bob Ezrin

      Album Tracks:

      1. Throw My bones
      2. Drop the Weapon
      3. We’re All the Same in the Dark
      4. Nothing at All
      5. No Need to Shout
      6. Step by Step
      7. What the What
      8. The Long Way Round
      9. The Power of the Moon
      10. Remission Possible
      11. Man Alive
      12. And the Address
      13. Dancing in My Sleep

      Listener Mail/Comments

      • Comments about the show? Things you’d like us to cover?  We’d love to hear from you. Send us an email at info@deeppurplepodcast.com or @ us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.


      Episode #67 – Our Deep Purple Collections

      Disclaimer: The video used on YouTube is a byproduct of producing our audio podcast. We post it merely as a convenience to those who prefer the YouTube format. Please subscribe using one of the links below if you’d prefer a superior audio experience.

      Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Anchor.fm, Breaker, PodBean, RadioPublic, or search in your favorite podcatcher! 

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        • Janne Juola – PAYPAL ONE TIME AGAIN!
        • John Convery – NEW PATRON ALERT!!
          • I have been listening to you guys for a while now and I feel like I am lucky to have found people who are even bigger fans than me who are also fun to listen to. In a strange way I think my favorite episode was on Captain Beyond because I always just assumed that they were a lame joke. Thanks for showing me that I was wrong! 
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      Thanks to our Brothers at the Deep Dive Podcast Network:

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      Show Updates:

      • Comments from social media.
      • Apple Podcasts Review – Dopefish , 07/05/2020 – 5 STARS!
        • Lots of detail, fun listen!
        • Glad to find a podcast that gives a crap about the fiddly detail about a band I like in the same way I do. Great listen if you’re at all into Deep Purple beyond Smoke on the Water!

      A Word from Our Sponsor:

      • Joe Lynn Turner &  Back in the Saddle Again

      John & Nate’s Collection Over the Years:

      • In this episode we go through some of the Deep Purple items we’ve collected over the years. Very little of this has any value to us other than emotional. If you’re looking for an impressive collection of one of a kind items, this episode is not for you. If you’re looking to see some items we collected as teenagers getting into Deep Purple then check it out!

      Listener Mail/Comments

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